Hibbitt & Barnes Family History


Sarah Louisa OLIVER - (1844 - abt. 1931)

Sarah Louisa OLIVER was born in Bramwith Woodhouse, near Doncaster, in Yorkshire in 1844. She was the daughter of John OLIVER, a farmer, and Sarah (nee WOODALL) and was baptized on 1st May 1844 in Kirk Bramwith.

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In 1851, six year old Sarah was at boarding school with her two elder sisters in Thorne, about 4 or 5 miles from her family...

Name: Sarah L Oliver 
Age: 6 
Estimated birth year: abt 1845 
Relation: Boarder 
Gender: Female 
Where born: Bramwith; Woodhouse, Yorkshire 
Civil parish: Thorne 
Town: Thorne 
County/Island: Yorkshire 
Country: England 
Street Address: King Street
Occupation: Boarding Scholar
Registration district: Thorne 
Sub-registration district: Epworth 
ED, institution, or vessel: 5c 
Household schedule number: 145 

Household Members: Name Age 
Hannah Haworth 58 (School Mistress)
Ann Haworth 36 (School Mistress)
Mary Anne Haworth 11 
Clara Jane Haworth 11 
Elizabeth Oliver 8 
Sarah L Oliver 6 
Sarah Ann Drabes 13 
Elizabeth Drabes 11

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By 1861, she was living at home with her family in the hamlet of Bramwith Woodhouse...

Name: Sarah Louisa Oliver 
Age: 16 
Estimated birth year: abt 1845 
Relation: Daughter 
Father's Name: John 
Gender: Female 
Where born: Bramwith Woodhouse, Yorkshire, England 
Civil parish: Kirk Bramwith 
County/Island: Yorkshire 
Country: England 
Street Address: Bramwith Woodhouse Rd
Occupation: Farmer's Daughter
Registration district: Doncaster 
Sub-registration district: Campsall 
ED, institution, or vessel: 13 
Household schedule number: 2 

Household Members: Name Age 
John Oliver 59 
John Henry Oliver 23 
Charles Edwin Oliver 14 
Sarah Louisa Oliver 16 
Sarah Styring 21 (House Servant)

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Sarah's daughter's birth record notes that she married John George Waldegrave BARNES on 29th March 1865 at Hanover Square, London, England. However, further investigation has found no evidence of this marriage ever having taken place.

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Sarah and John travelled to Australia in 1865 on the ss Great Britain. The Index to Unassisted Inward Passenger Lists to Victoria 1852-1923 records the following information...

Family Name First Name Age Month Year Ship Port Fiche Page
BARNES SARAH L MRS 21 SEP 1865 GREAT BRITAIN B 249 007
BARNES JOHN GEO 26 SEP 1865 GREAT BRITAIN B 249 007

The book, 'Is yours an SS Great Britain family?' by Adrian Ball, also notes the couple as...

Barnes John George 26-27
Barnes Sarah 21-27

After their ages, the number 27 signifies the Great Britain's 27th voyage. The ship left Liverpool on 25th July 1865 and took 56 days to arrive at her destination. There were 142 crew members and 504 passengers on board for the journey to Melbourne, Australia.

Photographs of the ss Great Britain appear in the 'Photos' section of this web site.

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John and Sarah had their daughter in Bay Street, Brighton, Victoria, Australia, in 1867 but two years later, Sarah was back in England with her daughter in tow, and no John. She then rekindled a prior relationship she had had with William Elbert DANDO.

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On the 1871 census, Sarah was shown as being William DANDO'S wife but they didn't in fact marry until 1875. Living with them was Sarah's 4 year old daughter, Alicia BARNES (in fact it should have been Alitea).

Name: Sarah Dando
[Sarah Louisa Oliver] 
Age: 27 
Estimated birth year: abt 1844 
Relation: Wife 
Spouse's name: William 
Gender: Female 
Where born: Bramwith, Yorkshire, England 
Civil parish: Hornsey 
Ecclesiastical parish: St Mary Hornsey 
County/Island: Middlesex 
Country: England 
Registration district: Edmonton 
Sub-registration district: Hornsey 
ED, institution, or vessel: 1 
Household schedule number: 201 

Household Members: Name Age 
William Dando 28 
Sarah Dando 27 
Alicia Barnes 4 [should read as Alitea]
Eliza Wigglesworth 48 (Lodger). [This person's occupation looks to read as an Assistant.]

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William DANDO applied for a licence to marry Sarah when she was about one month pregnant...

DIOCESE OF LONDON.
4th October 1875.
APPEARED PERSONALLY, William Elbert Dando Esquire of the Parish of Saint James Piccadilly in the County of Middlesex, a Bachelor, of the age of twenty one years and upwards and prayed a Licence for the Solemnization of Matrimony in the Parish Church of Saint James Piccadilly, aforesaid between him and Sarah Louisa Barnes of the same Parish, a Widow, and made Oath that he believeth that there is no Impediment of Kindred or Alliance, or of any other lawful cause, nor any Suit commenced in any Ecclesiastical Court to bar or hinder the Proceeding of the said Matrimony, according to the tenor of such Licence. And he further made oath, that he the said Appearer hath had his usual Place of abode within the said Parish of Saint James Piccadilly for the space of Fifteen days last past.
[signed] William Elbert Dando
Sworn before me.
J? S May
Surrogate.

The details which appear on the marriage certificate for Sarah Louisa OLIVER and William Elbert DANDO are as follows...

1875. Marriage solemnized at The Church in the Parish of St James's Westminster in the County of Middlesex
Date: Oct 11 1875
Groom: William Elbert Dando (Bachelor)
Profession: Gentleman
Father's Name: Joseph Dando
Father's Profession: Manufacturer (dec'd)
Bride: Sarah Louisa Barnes (Widow)
Father's name: John Oliver
Father's Profession: Farmer (dec'd)
Ages: Full
Residence: St James's (for both)
Married in the church according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Established Church, by Licence.
Witnesses: Charles Louis and Sam Walton
Curate: Lionel Davidson

(Note - Sarah declared herself a widow but, as she had not in fact married John G W BARNES, she should have called herself OLIVER).

Photos of St James's Church can be viewed in the Gallery.
The author's visit to St James's Church appears on the blog.

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Sarah may have been pregnant when they married as the couple's son, Charles Llewellyn Ernest Elbert DANDO, was born in the following June. Their residence was then 86 Regent Street, Westminster, Middlesex.

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The marriage was not a happy one and Sarah left William in June 1877. There were some chaotic episodes preceding what must have been a very public divorce case.

The following article appeared in The Times on Tuesday 4th September 1877...

At MARLBOROUGH-STREET, Mrs. SARAH LOUISA DANDO and Mrs. ANNIE LEWIS, both residing at 36, Waverley-road, Harrow-road, were brought before Mr. Newton on a warrant charged; the first-named with taking a drug for an unlawful purpose, and the latter-named prisoner with aiding and abetting in the offence. Mr. Wontner prosecuted, and Mr. Besley, barrister, defended. George Shepherd, a coachman, said on the 30th of April last he was in the service of Mr. Dando, of 86 Regent-street. Mrs. Dando lived at that time with Mr. Dando. On or about the 30th of April he drove Mrs. Lewis, whom he knew by riding in the carriage with Mrs. Dando, to several places - linendrapers, and then to a chymist's shop. He called at Mr. Eland's, a chymist in Oxford-street, and Mrs. Lewis went in. He then drove to Whiteley's and afterwards to a chymist's nearly opposite. Cross-examined, witness said Mr. Dando saw him on the 23d of last month, and asked him if he knew anything about going to a chymist's shop. Witness replied in the affirmative. Mr. Dando said he wanted a divorce from his wife, but he did not say that he had been in that court for assaulting her. On Saturday witness come to the court and swore an information. No one teld him Mr. Dando was going to charge his wife. He knew Mr. Dando was going to get up a charge of some sort, but he did not know what it was. Detective-sergeant Walter Andrews, Scotland-yard, said he received a warrant from this court on Saturday last, and in the evening went to 36, Waverley-road, Harrow-road, Paddington, and saw the two prisoners. He told them he was a detective officer and held warrants for their apprehension. Mrs. Dando cried and said, "I know who has done this ; it is my husband. Its quite true I took some ergot, but I'll tell you how it happened." Mrs. Dando then explained that, after some difficulty, she and Mrs. Lewis had procured the drug at a chymist's in Westbourne-park. Mrs. Lewis said "I did go to get the stuff, and I saw her take some of the stuff, and I really did not think there was any thing wrong about it. "Mrs. Emily Shreb said she was formerly in Mr. Dando's service. She remembered Mrs. Dando showing her a bottle containing a dark fluid. The bottle was placed on the mantelpiece in the bedroom, and Mr. Dando could have seen it as well as witness could. Mr. Dando knew what his wife was taking, and it was partly at his request that she did so. Witness once heard Mr. Dando say "Don't take too much of what you are taking." Witness thought that was the morning after Mrs. Dando went to the chymist's. Mrs. Dando took it while Mr. Dando was in the room. Mrs. Dando said Mr. Dando knew all about it. Mr. Besley said it was clear that Mr. Dando should be put in the dock, and the prisoners called to give evidence against him. Mr. Newton requested Sergeant Andrews to represent the matter to the Commissioners of Police. The prisoners were remanded on their own recognizances.

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The Lloyds Weekly Newspaper on 9th September 1877 went into a little more detail...

SERIOUS CHARGE. Mrs. Sarah Louisa Dando and Mrs. Annie Lewis, residing at 36, Waverley-road, Harrow-road, were brought up at Marlborough-street police-court, on Monday, on a warrant, charged - the first-named with administering to herself feloniously a certain drug with intent to procure abortion, and the latter with aiding and abetting in the offence.
George Shepherd, of 3, Havelock-street, King's-cross, said : I am a coachman. On the 30th of April last I was in the service of Mr. Dando, of 86, Regent-street, and Mrs. Dando lived at that time with Mr. Dando. On or about the 30th of April I drove Mrs. Lewis, whom I know by riding in the carriage with Mrs. Dando, to several places - linendrapers, and then to a chemist's shop. I called at Mr. Eland's, a chemist in Oxford-street, and Mrs. Lewis went in. I then drove to Whiteley's, and afterwards to a chemist's nearly opposite. Mrs. Lewis went into the chemist's shop and came out, but I did not hear anything. Afterwards I drove to Mr. Shepherd's, in All Saints'-road. I looked through the window, and saw Mr. Shepherd mixing up something. Mrs. Dando made a remark as to how long Mrs. Lewis had been in the shop. I then drove back to 86, Regent-street. - In cross-examination by Mr. Besley, the witness said: I did not know that Mr. Dando had been brought to that court in June last for assaulting his wife. On the 23rd of last month Mr. Dando asked me if I knew anything about going to a chemist's shop, and I said "Yes." He said he wanted a divorce from his wife. I did not understand that he spoke to me with reference to procuring something for abortion.
Detective-serjeant Walter Andrews said : On Saturday evening I went to 36, Waverley-road, Harrow-road, Paddington, and saw the two prisoners. I told them I was a detective officer, and had warrants for their apprehension, telling them the charges and reading the warrants. Mrs. Dando cried, and said, "I know who has done this - it's my husband. I did take some drug, but I'll tell you how it happened." Mrs. Dando then added - "Thinking I might be in the family way and being in pain, I went to a doctor and asked him to give me something to bring on a miscarriage. The doctor did not write me a prescription, but told me to take a certain medicine, and that I should be likely to get it at a chemist's in Oxford-street. I drove there with Mrs. Lewis, and she tried to get it, but was refused to be served without a medical order. We afterwards went to another chemist's in Westbourne-park and there Mrs. Lewis got it, saying it was for haemorhage. We then went back to Regent-street, and I took some of the drug much against Mrs. Shred's wish, she stating she would tell my husband. Even now I don't feel sure I was in the family-way." Mrs. Lewis stated, "I did go to get the stuff. Mrs. Dando told me she was in the family-way, and I saw her take some. I really did not think there was anything wrong about it." I then took the prisoners to the station. I am not sure whether Mrs. Dando said the medicine was to "bring on" or to "procure miscarriage."
Mrs. Emily Shred, residing in Surrey, said : I was formerly in Mr. Dando's service. I remember Mrs. Dando at the end of April going out in a carriage. She said on her return that she had been to a medical man, and asked him to give her something for a miscarriage, but that he declined to give her any prescription. He told her, however, that, if she went to Oxford-street, she would be most likely to get something. She said the doctor would have given her something, but he did not like his name mixed up with the matter. I saw Mrs. Dando on her return from the chemist's, and she showed me a bottle containing a dark fluid, Mr. Dando being present. Mrs. Dando took the bottle into her room, and she afterwards told me that she had taken a dose. I fetched some gin for Mrs. Dando, and after she had taken the medicine she took some of the gin. I told Mrs. Dando that if she was taking the stuff for an unlawful purpose she was very wrong. I begged of her not to take it, and told her that if she took it I would tell Mr. Dando. - By Mr. Besley : The bedroom was occupied by the husband and wife, and they lived together as husband and wife. The bottle was placed on the mantelpiece in the bedroom, and Mr. Dando could have seen it as well as I could. Mrs. Dando had a child about 12 months old by Mr. Dando.
The Witness (replying to Mr. Newton) said : I did not think Mr. Dando wanted telling about the matter. He knew Mrs. Dando was taking this drug, and it was partly at his request that Mrs. Dando took it, as he told her that he did not wish for any more children ; would not have any more; and that he would not support them if she had any more. I once heard Mr. Dando say, "Ducky, don't take too much of what you are taking." I think that was the morning after Mrs. Dando obtained the drug. Mrs. Dando took it while Mr. Dando was in the room. I told Mrs. Dando I did not believe she was in the family-way, and I don't know that Mrs. Dando said Mr. Dando knew all about it.
Mr. Newton : It is a very serious matter if the man was a party to the whole affair.
Mr. Besley said he did not propose to put any questions to the witness, but had no doubt the Treasury would do its duty. He asked for a remand, for after what had been stated it was clear that Mr. Dando should be put in the dock, and the prisoners called to give evidence against him.
Mr. Newton requested Serjeant Andrews to represent the matter to the Commissioners of Police, that they might take action in the matter if they considered it advisable.
In the course of the case it having been stated that four men had been to Mrs. Lewis's house, broken in, and taken away a child by a former marriage, Mr. Newton told Mrs. Lewis that when she returned home if she found anything wrong to at once go to the Marylebone police-court.
Mr. Wontner said that as far as the last part of the last witness's evidence went, nothing had been said to the prosecution. - Mr. Newton : How could all that has occurred have taken place without the connivance of Mr. Dando?
Mr. Dando : Will you hear a few words from me? - Mr. Newton: Certainly not. - The prisoners were remanded on their own recognisances.

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The Times - Tuesday 11th September 1877...

At MARLBOROUGH-STREET, Mrs. SARAH LOUISA DANDO, of 36, Waverley-road, wife of Mr. Dando, of 86, Regent-street, was charged, on remand, with administering to herself a drug, with a felonious intent; and Mrs. ANNIE LEWIS was charged, also on remand, with aiding and abetting her in the offence. Mr. Straight attended on the part of the Treasury. Mr. Straight said, as the case originally came before Mr. Newton, the request he had now to make was that there should be a further adjournment for a fortnight, that Mr. Newton might hear the case throughout. Mr. Besley, while not exactly resisting the application, would say that the charge preferred against his clients was of a dastardly and interested character, the charge being preferred simply for objects in the Divorce Court, the main purpose of the prosecutor being to get a divorce. He asked that the case might he adjourned sine die. Mr. Straight again pressed for an adjournment for a fortnight. Mr. Flowers acceded to the application, and the case was adjourned accordingly.

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The Wednesday 26th September 1877 edition of The Times saw the next instalment of the story...

At MARLBOROUGH-STREET, Mrs. SARAH LOUISE DANDO, wife of Mr. Dando, 86, Regent-street, and Mrs. ANNIE LEWIS were finally examined, the first charged with attempting to procure abortion by drugs, the latter with aiding in the offence. Mr. Straight appeared for the prosecution ; Mr. Besley defended. George Shepherd stated that he was formerly in Mr. Dando's service as coachman. In April last he drove the two prisoners to various chymist's shops, and in one of them he saw Lewis receive a mixture and bring it to the other prisoner in the carriage. Cross-examined, witness said he knew that Mr. Dando had been charged with assaulting his wife. Mr. Dando saw him recently and asked him about going to the chymists' shops, stating that he wanted a divorce from his wife. Witness did not recollect Mr. Dando mentioning the word "abortion." He afterwards swore an information at that court, and knew that Mr. Dando was going to charge his wife with something, but did not know what. Detective Andrews stated that he served the warrant on the prisoners at 26, Waverley-road, Harrow-road. He told them he had a warrant against Mrs. Dando for procuring abortion and against Mrs. Lewis for aiding and abetting. Mrs. Dando said, "I know who has done this ; it is my husband." She added that under medical advice she had taken some ergot. Mrs. Lewis said she was asked to get some "stuff" without thinking there was anything wrong about it. On cross-examination by Mr. Besley, the detective said he had been requested by the Commissioner to inquire into the matter. He had reported that Mr. Dando had assaulted his wife, and had a suit against her in the Divorce Court. Emily Threed, formerly servant to Mr. Dando, remembered Shepherd driving Mrs. Dando and Mrs. Lewis out in the evening about April last. Mrs. Dando, when she came home, said she had been to get something for what the witness knew to be an unlawful purpose, and showed her a bottle containing a dark liquid. Mrs. Lewis was present. Mrs. Dando afterwards came into the kitchen and said she had taken a dose of the stuff, and that she was going to take some more. Witness told Mrs. Dando she thought it was wrong if she was taking the stuff for an unlawful purpose, and begged her not to do so again. If she did she would tell Mr. Dando. Cross-examined by Mr. Besley, witness said she knew that what Mrs. Dando was taking was ergot of rye. It was in a bottle on the mantle-piece in their bedroom. Mrs. Dando told her she was taking the "stuff" partly at her husband's request. Her husband knew it was ergot of rye, and did not object to her taking it. He said if she had any more children he would not keep them. Heard Mr. Dando on one occasion tell Mrs. Dando not to take too much. Mrs. Dando told her that she told her husband all about what she had done. The magistrate intimated that if this evidence remained uncontradicted the prosecutor ought to be placed by the side of his wife. When the case was resumed yesterday, Mr. Straight intimated that, as there was a suit in the Divorce Court pending, he had advised, and he hoped wisely, the prosecutor to withdraw the charge before the court. Mr. Besley said as he had from the first denounced the charge as one of a cowardly and dastardly character, he repeated his words in all their strength. Mr. Mansfield said there was no further evidence before him, and, in the circumstances, he thought the most judicious course had been taken in abandoning the charges. The defendants were then discharged.

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The Times printed the following report the next day, Thursday 27th September 1877...

At MARYLEBONE, WILLIAM ELBERT DANDO, of 24, Regent-street ; EDWARD AUGUSTUS DANDO, of the Great Northern Railway, King's-cross ; ALFRED HUTCHINSON, 10, Wimpole-mews, Marylebone ; WILLIAM SCOTT, 63, Angers-street, New-cross ; and SYDNEY MAYHEW, 50, Walbrook, appeared before Mr. Cooke in answer to summonses which charged them with forcibly entering the dwelling-house, 36, Waverley-road, Paddington. They were further charged with assaulting Mr. and Mrs. Blackman and Mrs. Edmunds. Mr. Kelly appeared for the prosecution ; Mr. Goldenberg was for Mr. Mayhew. The wife of William Dando and a Mrs. Lewis were recently charged at Marlborough-street with a serious offence. The case was adjourned, they being allowed to go out on their own recognizances to appear. At the same time it was stated that Mr. W. E. Dando had forcibly broken into his wife's house, 26, Waverley-road, Paddington, and Mr. Newton, the presiding magistrate, suggested that if a breach of the Law had been committed he should be prosecuted. Mrs. Dando and Mrs. Lewis appeared at the Marlborough-street Police-court on Tuesday, and the case against them was withdrawn. It appears that on the day Mrs. Dando was taken into custody, Mr. Dando called a police-constable of the X Division and said that he wished him to accompany him to the house of Mr. Blackman, 36, Waverley-road, Paddington. where his wife was lodging, in case any disturbance should occur. Mr. Dando demanded admittance to the house, and on being told by Mr. Blackman, who answered the door, that he could not go upstairs, pushed past. Mr. Dando broke the panels of a door, doing damage to the amount of £1 8s, and collected documents which belonged to him or his wife. Mr. Mayhew, the solicitor to Mr. Dando, was sent for. When he arrived he was admitted to the house, but he with the other defendants took no part in the affair, with the exception of seeing some boxes taken out at the direction of Mr. Dando. At the close of the case for the prosecution Mr. W. E. Dando, who had a summons against Mr. Blackman for assault, said he would leave the case in the magistrate's hands, and not go on with the summons. Mr. Cooke, in dismissing the whole of the summonses, said he thought that Mr. Dando had a right to go to the house to get certain papers, but he ought to pay for the damage he had done, and if he did not pay it a summons would be granted against him.

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Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper (London, England) - Sunday, September 30, 1877; Issue 1819...

MARLBOROUGH-STREET. THE STRANGE CHARGE AGAINST A WIFE. - Mrs. Sarah Louise Dando, wife of Mr. Dando, 86, Regent-street, and Mrs. Anne Lewis were finally examined, the first charged with attempting to procure abortion by drugs, the latter with aiding in the offence. - Mr. Straight intimated that, as there was a suit in the Divorce court pending, he had advised, and he hoped wisely, the prosecutor to withdraw the charge before the Court. - Mr. Besley said as he had from the first denounced the charge as one of a cowardly and dastardly character, he repeated his words in all their strength. - Mr. Mansfield said there was no further evidence before him, and in the circumstances he thought the most judicious course had been taken in abandoning the charges. - The defendants were then discharged.

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Daily News (London, England) - Tuesday, October 23, 1877; Issue 9830...

MARLBOROUGH-STREET. Elbert Dando, No. 86, Regent-street, was summoned for assaulting his wife, Mrs. Sarah Louisa, Dando. - Mr. Grain appeared for the complainant; and Mr. Wontner for the defendant. - Mr. Wontner said he was not prepared to go into the case, and it was rather annoying to have to answer such charges while proceedings were still pending in the Divorce Court. - Mr. Newton, from what had ocurred in that court last month and elsewhere, said he was in hopes he should never see the parties again. Mr. Grain said Mrs. Dando had felt it necessary to come to that court for protection. She would be satisfied if her husband was bound over to keep the peace. - Mr. Wonter could not consent to that unless the complainant was also bound over. - Mr. Grain had no objection to that. - Mr. Newton thought the wisest course would be for both parties to be bound over, and his decision would be in accordance with that view.

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When the divorce case finally came to court, William was unsuccessful in his petition but the case reveals Sarah was by no means innocent.

There was an enlightening article published in The Times on Friday 21st February 1879, which read as follows...

PROBATE, DIVORCE, AND ADMIRALTY DIVISION.
(Before the Right Hon. the PRESIDENT and a Special Jury.)
DANDO V. DANDO, WADHAM, AGNEW, AND HARROWEN.

Dr. Deane, Q.C., and Mr. Bayford appeared for the petitioner ; Mr. Serjeant Parry and Mr. Pritchard were for the respondent ; Sir Henry James, Q.C., Mr. Inderwick, Q.C., and Mr. Middleton were for the co-respondent Dr. Wadham ; Mr. W. G. Harrison, Q.C., and Mr. Searle for the co-respondent Major-General Agnew.

In this case the petitioner, Mr. William Elbert Dando, sought for a divorce from his wife on the ground of her alleged adultery with the several co-respondents. The only case which it was attempted to prove was that against the second co-respondent, Major-General Agnew. It appeared that in 1863 the petitioner had sought for an introduction to the respondent from having seen her portrait in a friend's album and had at once proposed marriage to her. Her father, who was a large farmer near Doncaster, at first opposed any engagement, but soon withdrew his objections. At the end of three months, however, the engagement was broken off, and they do not appear to have met again for years. In 1864 she left her home, and went to Australia with a Mr. Barnes in the following year. Returning to England four years later, she found herself in London towards the end of 1869 without money or friends, and she then sent a letter to the petitioner, who at once went to see her. From this date until that of their marriage in 1875 they lived together at intervals and at various places. In July, 1871, she had gone to Ramsgate, and there made the acquaintance of Major-General Agnew, to whom she represented herself as a widow. It was not denied that there had existed an improper intimacy between herself and the latter from this date until the commencement of February, 1872, when he had to return to India. On October 11, 1875, the petitioner married the respondent at St. James's Church, Piccadilly, and he being then the manager of the London General Cab Company, they lived together at 86, Regent-street, the offices of that company. It appeared that they did not from this date live happily together, and she left him in June, 1877. Two months after this he had brought a charge against her of having attempted to procure abortion in the preceding May. The case was adjourned that the Treasury authorities might be asked to take up the prosecution, but this they refused to do. Just before this she had charged him with assault, and he had eventually been bound over to keep the peace for four months. It was attempted to show that the intimacy which had previously existed between Major-General Agnew and the respondent had been renewed on his return from India in 1876 ; but this failed entirely, though the latter did not deny that he had seen the respondent both at her own house and at another in Maida-vale several times in 1876 and 1877. It appeared that after his return to India he had remitted money regularly to the respondent as "Mrs. Barnes" up to the date of her marriage ; and the petitioner, though he denied having taken this money, admitted that at the time he was living with the respondent and that the money had gone to supply the wants of their home. The petitioner had claimed £1,000 damages against each of the three co-respondents, but declared in his evidence that if any were given he wished them to be settled on his wife. She was defended by counsel, but did not appear to give evidence. Major-General Agnew, on the other hand, went into the box and most emphatically denied that there had been any improper intimacy between himself and the respondent after 1872, admitting that he had seen her occasionally after 1875 ; this, he said, was always at her request, and she had wished to see him with reference to the education of the child she had had by Mr. Barnes, for whom the petitioner would do nothing. It was very imprudent, he admitted, but there had been no secrecy about these interviews, some of them, indeed being held at the house of her husband, in Regent-street, but none after she left him.

The jury, without leaving the box, found that the respondent had not committed adultery with any of the co-respondents, and
The PRESIDENT dismissed the petition with costs, emphatically declaring that it was a case that ought never have come into court.

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Similarly The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) printed the following on Friday, February 28, 1879; Issue 10653...

DIVORCE CASES.
DANDO v. DANDO.
On Thursday, the suit of Dando v. Dando, Wadham, Agnew, and Harrower, in which the petitioner, Mr William Elbert Dando, manager of the Patent Cab Company, prays for a divorce from his wife on the ground of her infidelity with the parties mentioned above, one of whom, Mr Wadham, is a doctor, and the second, Agnew, a retired major-general in the Indian army, was heard before the President and a special jury. The petitioner first met the respondent, then Miss Oliver, after having seen her photograph in 1863. He then became engaged to her, but the engagement was shortly after broken off and the respondent married a Mr Barnes and went to Australia. In 1869 Mrs Barnes returned to England and wrote the petitioner a letter expressing an earnest wish to see him before she finally returned to Australia. The result of the interview which followed upon this letter was that the petitioner and respondent lived together as man and wife till 1875 in London and in Jersey. ln October of that year they were married at St. James's Church, Piccadilly. Prior to this, however, the respondent had lived under the protection of the co-respondent, then Colonel Agnew, and doubtless the real Mr Barnes, and of this she told her husband. Two letters were read by Dr Deane, in opening these facts, which had been received by the respondent from the General, then at Gulhatti and Kohat in India, in which he addressed her in the most endearing terms. The respondent wrote to him to tell him of her marriage, and asked him to bring her an Indian workbox, and immediately on his return he visited her, at her husband's house, and, as it appeared, with her husband's consent and knowledge. While he was away at his daily business the respondent used to drive out, and, as alleged by the petitioner, used to have illicit meetings at St. Leonard's House, Maida Vale, with the general, on discovery of which proceedings for dissolution were instituted. The respondent, when living with the general, had been confined of a child; towards it and its mother's maintenance he contributed money. On the respondent's marriage the supplies were continued, and the case for the co-respondent, General Agnew, was that they were sent with her husband's consent, and that the charge of infidelity after the general's return was a fiction by which to extort damages. The case against the other co-respondent was not investigated, and the respondent did not appear. The jury found against the petitioner on all issues, and the President dismissed the petition, and condemned the petitioner in all costs, stating that the action ought never to have been brought.

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Sarah's husband, William Elbert DANDO, 'married' Emma SHERIFF in Manhatten, New York, in 1884. This 'marriage' was more than likely a bigamous one as there is evidence to suggest William was still married to Sarah - only in 1890, 6 years after the said 'marriage', did Sarah acquire a judicial separation from William and no evidence of a divorce has yet come to light. In the separation papers, Sarah cited William as having committed adultery with, and continuing to live with, 'Miss SHERIFF'.

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Sarah's whereabouts in 1881 is still unknown. However, in 1891, she appeared on the census at a lodging house in Paddington using the surname, DAUCH, describing herself as an actress. Her daughter, Alitea, was with her, by now 24 years old and working as a governess...

Name: Sarah L Dauch
Age: 42 
Estimated birth year: abt 1849
Relation: Lodger 
Gender: Female 
Where born: Doncaster, Yorkshire, England 
Civil parish: Paddington 
Ecclesiastical parish: St Paul 
County/Island: London 
Country: England 
Street Address: 10 Ranelagh Rd
Occupation: Actress
Condition as to marriage: Married
Registration district: Paddington 
Sub-registration district: St Mary Paddington 
ED, institution, or vessel: 3 

Household Members: Name Age 
Nash Reynolds 50 
Elizabeth Reynolds 54 
William Reynolds 18 
Sarah L Dauch 42 
Alitea W Barnes 24 
Amy L Martin 17

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In 1901, Sarah was described as a visitor in the household of a George Horne...

Name: Sarah L Dando
Age: 55 
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1846 
Relation: Visitor 
Gender: Female 
Where born: Bramwith, Yorkshire 
Civil parish: Willesden 
Ecclesiastical parish: Christchurch 
County/Island: Middlesex 
Country: England 
Street Address: 35 Windermere Ave
Occupation: Living on own means
Condition as to marriage: Married
Registration district: Hendon 
Sub-registration district: Willesden 
ED, institution, or vessel: 54 
Household schedule number: 155 
Piece: 1223 
Folio: 130 
Page Number: 28

Household Members: Name Age 
George Horne 40 
May W Horne 8 
Norah E Horne 2 
Sarah L Dando 55 (Visitor)

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Sarah turned up in 1911 working as a housekeeper for a school head teacher and his family, at Fairleigh', London Rd, Wembley. The property had 7 rooms including the kitchen...

Address: 'Fairleigh', London Rd, Wembley - 7 rooms including the kitchen.
Edwin James Sainsbury, (Head), Age: 46, Married, Schoolmaster Hd Teacher, Born: Hants, Southampton.
Ada Elizabeth Sainsbury, (Wife), Age: 28, Married 4 years, 1 child - living, Born: Cucklington, Somerset.
Montague Quintin Sainsbury, (Son), Age: 11, School, Born: Middlesex Harlesden.
Francis Quinton Sainsbury, (Son), Age: 5, Born: Middlesex, Wembley.
Margaret Ursula Sainsbury, (Daughter), Age: 3 mths, Born: Middlesex, Wembley.
Sarah Louisa Dando, Servant, Age: 66, Married 36 years, 1 child [should be 2], 2 still living, Housekeeper, Born: Yorkshire, Bramwith.

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Sarah died in 1931, aged 86, and her death was registered in the registration district of Willesden, Middlesex, under the name, DANDO.

The Death Index states...

Name: Sarah L Dando 
Death Registration Month/Year: 1931 
Age at death (estimated): 86 
Registration district: Willesden 
Inferred County: Middlesex 
Volume: 3a 
Page: 437

 

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