Hibbitt & Barnes Family History


William Elbert DANDO - (abt. 1843 - abt 1918)

William Elbert DANDO was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, on 20 February 1843, the eldest child of Joseph DANDO and Harriet Catherine (nee WILLIAMS). He was baptised at the Church of the Ascension in Philadelphia on 20th July that same year. It seems William might have used his middle name, Elbert, as he was referred to as W. Elbert Dando in numerous sources. Nevertheless, we shall continue to call him William for the purposes of this biography.

William led a colourful life which included travel, assault, bankruptcy, bad business practices and perhaps even corruption, a warrant for his arrest, an unsuccessful divorce petition, kidnap and bigamy. He might have been a flamboyant character, well equipped to carry off his shady business dealings but, the fact he and his family felt the need to adopt an alias at one stage, shows just how close he must have sailed to the wind.

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Our first sight of William is on the 1851 England Census. He was a schoolboy residing in Bristol, possibly at boarding school. The census details are as follows...

Name: William Dando
Age: 8
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1843
Relation: Scholar
Gender: Male
Where born: United States British Subject
Civil Parish: Bristol St Andrew
Ecclesiastical parish: St Andrew
County/Island: Gloucestershire
Country: England
Street address: Somerset Street
Registration district: Clifton
Sub-registration district: Ashley

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We next find that William applied for a patent...

London Gazette - 14 January 1859 (Provisional Patent)

2914. To William Elbert Dando, of the State of Pennsylvania, in the United States of America, at present residing in Manchester, in the county of Lancaster, Clerk, for the invention of " improvements in apparatus for lowering boats from ships or vessels, and also for raising the same as required.

London Gazette - 29th March 1859 (Proceeding with Patent)

2914. And William Elbert Dando, of the State of Pennsylvania, in the United States of America, at present residing in Manchester, in the county of Lancaster, Clerk, has given the like notice in respect of the invention of " improvements in apparatus for lowering boats from ships or vessels, and also for raising the same as required."
As set forth in his petition, recorded in the said office on the 21st day of December, 1858.

London Gazette - 28th January 1862 (Expiry of Patent)

2914. 21st December.
William Elbert Dando, of the State of Pennsylvania, in the United States of America, at present residing in Manchester, in the county of Lancaster, Clerk.
Improvements in apparatus for lowering boats from ships or vessels, and also for raising the same as required.

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In 1861, we find 19 year old William on the census living with his family in Cheetham, Lancashire, working as an Accountant's Clerk, most likely with his accountant father, Joseph. The census reads as follows...

Name: William E Dando
Age: 19
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1842
Relation: Son
Father's Name: Joseph
Mother's Name: Harriet C
Gender: Male
Where born: Philadelphia, United States
Civil Parish: Cheetham
Ecclesiastical parish: St Luke
County/Island: Lancashire
Country: England
Street address: 158 Rydal Mount
Occupation: Accountant's Clerk
Registration district: Manchester
Sub-registration district: Cheetham

Household Members: Name Age
Joseph Dando 58
Harriet C Dando 42
William E Dando 19
Augustus E Dando 10
Louisa H Dando 5
Henry B Dando 3
Bridget Wilson 46 (Servant)

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It looks as though William had gone into partnership with his father at one stage because, on 1st July 1864, the London Gazette published the following...

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, Joseph Dando and William Elbert Dando, as Auditors and Accountants, is this day dissolved by mutual consent. -Dated the 30th June, 1864.
Joseph Dando.
Wm. Elbert Dando.

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Another patent application appeared in the London Gazette in 1868. This time William seems to have indulged himself in an area in which his family had been involved for many generations, hats...

London Gazette - 20th November 1868 (Provisional Patent)

3322. To William Elbert Dando, of Manchester, in the county of Lancaster, for the invention of " improved mourning hats."

London Gazette - 2nd March 1869 (Proceeding with Patent)

3322. And William Elbert Dando, of Manchester, in the county of Lancaster, has given the like notice in respect of the invention of "improved mourning hats."
As set forth in his petition, recorded in the said office on the 30th day of October, 1868.

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On the 1871 census, William was shown as having a wife called Sarah, but they didn't in fact marry until 1875. There was a 4 year old daughter named Alicia BARNES (in fact it should have been Alitea), who was Sarah's daughter by her previous relationship with John George Waldegrave BARNES.

Name: William Dando
Age: 28
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1843
Relation: Head
Spouse's Name: Sarah
Gender: Male
Where born: United States
Civil Parish: Hornsey
Ecclesiastical parish: St Mary Hornsey
County/Island: Middlesex
Country: England
Street address: Wilton Villa (Could be Milton or Hilton)
Occupation: Accountant
Registration district: Edmonton
Sub-registration district: Hornsey

Household Members: Name Age
William Dando 28
Sarah Dando 27
Alicia Barnes 4 [should read as Alitea]
Eliza Wigglesworth 48 (Lodger). [This person's occupation looks to read as an Assistant.]

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Another partnership was dissolved in 1871...

London Gazette - 10 November 1871

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, as Accountants, at Manchester, and elsewhere, has been this day dissolved by mutual consent. All debts will be paid and received by the undersigned Edward Andrew. -Dated this 3rd day of November, 1871.
Edward Andrew.
William Elbert Dando.

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William was adjudged bankrupt on 28th January 1875...

London Gazette - 9th February 1875.

The Bankruptcy Act,1869.
In the London Bankruptcy Court.
In the Matter of Proceedings for Liquidation by Arrangement or Composition with Creditors, instituted by William Elbert Dando, of Ealing, and of No. 88, Regent-street, both in the county of Middlesex, and formerly of No. 151, Strand, in the said county of Middlesex, carrying on business in copartnership with John Laird Halson, as Dando, Halson, and Company, Advertising Agents, but now a Manager of a Public Company.
NOTICE is hereby given, that a First General Meeting of the creditors of the above-named person has been summoned to be held at the Guildhall Coffee-house, Gresham-street, in the city of London, on the 18th day of February, 1875, at three o'clock in the afternoon precisely.
- Dated this 27th day of January, 1875.
SYDNEY MAYHEW, 30, Walbrook, London, Attorney for the Debtor.

The Times - 15th February 1875.

COURT OF CHANCERY, LINCOLN'S-INN, FEB. 13.
(Before thg LORDS JUSTICES of APPEAL.)
EX PARTE WALTON - IN RE DANDO.
This was an appeal from a decision of Mr. Registrar Pepys, as Chief Judge in Bankruptcy.
On the 4th of January last a petition for adjudication of bankruptcy against Mr. W. E. Dando was presented by Mr. John Fitzpatrick. The petition came on to be heard on the 28th of January, and an adjudication of bankruptcy was then made. On the previous day Dando had filed a liquidation petition, and the first meeting of the creditors under this petition was fixed for the 18th of February. On the 4th of February an application was made on behalf of the bankrupt and some of his creditors to the Registrar to stay the advertisement of the adjudication till after the 18th of February. This application was refused, and from this refusal the present appeal was brought.
Mr. Caldecott was for the appellants; Mr. J. S. Colquhoun was for the petitioning creditor.
Lord Justice MELLISH said he thought that, under sec. 80, sub-sec. 10, of the Bankruptcy Act, 1869, and the 266th rule of 1870, the Registrar had under the circumstances a discretion whether he would simply make an adjudication, or make an adjudication and stay all further proceedings until after the meeting of the creditors under the liquidation petition, or postpone his decision altogether until after the meeting. His Lordship said he had expressed this opinion in the recent case of "Ex parte Foster" ("Law Reports," 10, "Chan. App.," 59), though it was not necessary for the decision of that case. But on further consideration he adhered to that opinion. The only question, therefore, was whether the Registrar had properly exercised his discretion in the present case, and upon consideration of the circumstances, his Lordship thought that he had. The appeal, must, therefore, be dismissed.
Lord Justice JAMES concurred.

London Gazette - 26 February 1875.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
In the London Bankruptcy Court.
In the Matter of a Bankruptcy Petition against William Elbert Dando, of No. 151, Strand, in the county of Middlesex.
UPON the hearing of this Petition this day, and upon proof satisfactory to the Court of the debt of the Petitioner, and of the act of the Bankruptcy alleged to have been committed by the said William Elbert Dando having been given, it is ordered that the said William Elbert Dando be, and he is hereby, adjudged bankrupt. - Given under the Seal of the Court this 28th day of January, 1875.
By the Court,
P. H. Pepys; Registrar.
The First-General Meeting of the creditors of the said William Elbert Dando is hereby summoned to be held at the London Bankruptcy Court, Basinghall-street, in the city of London, on the 16th day of March, 1875, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, and that the Court has ordered the bankrupt to attend thereat for examination, and to produce thereat a statement of his affairs, as required by the statute.
Until the appointment of a Trustee, all persons having in their possession any of the effects of the bankrupt must deliver them, and all debts due to the bankrupt must be paid, to Philip Henry Pepys, Esq., one of the Registrars, at the office of Mr. Peter Paget, Official Assignee in the London Bankruptcy Court, Basinghall-street. Creditors must forward their Proofs of Debts to the Registrar, at the said address.

London Gazette - 9th April 1875.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
In the London Bankruptcy Court.
In the Matter of William Elbert Dando, of No. 151, Strand, in the county of Middlesex, a Bankrupt.
James Graham, of No. 2, John-street, Bedford-row, Accountant, has been appointed Trustee of the property of the bankrupt. The Court has appointed the Public Examination of the bankrupt to take place at the London Bankruptcy Court, Lincoln's-inn-fields, on the 23rd day of April, 1875, at half-past ten o'clock in the forenoon. All persons having in their possession any of the effects of the bankrupt must deliver them to the trustee, and all debts due to the bankrupt must be paid to the trustee. Creditors who have not yet proved their debts must forward their proofs of debts to the trustee.-Dated this 16th day of March, 1875.

The Times edition published on 20th April 1875 states that W. E. Dando has been called before Mr. Registrar Pepys to review taxation at 11.

London Gazette - 4th September 1877.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
In the London Bankruptcy Court.
In the Matter of William Elbert Dando, of 151, Strand, in the county of Middlesex, a Bankrupt.
NOTICE is hereby given, that a Meeting of the Creditors of the above-named bankrupt will be held at the London Bankruptcy Court, Lincoln's-inn-fields, in the county of Middlesex, before the Honourable W. C. Spring-Rice, one of the Registrars of the said Court, on the 19th day of September, 1877, at twelve o'clock at noon precisely, for the purpose of considering the propriety of accepting the resignation of James Graham, the present Trustee, and appointing a new Trustee in his place.- Dated this 3rd day of September, 1877.

London Gazette - 25 September 1877.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
In the London Bankruptcy Court.
In the Matter of William Elbert Dando, of No. 151, Strand, in the county of Middlesex, a Bankrupt.
Cecil Gurney, of 5, Gray's-inn-square, in the county of Middlesex, Accountant, has been appointed Trustee of the property of the bankrupt, in the place and stead of James Graham, who has resigned. All persons having in their possession any of the effects of the bankrupt must deliver them to the trustee, and all debts due to the bankrupt must be paid to the trustee. Creditors who have not yet proved their debts must forward their proofs of debts to the trustee .-Dated this 19th day of September, 1877.

London Gazette - 12th March 1878.

In the London Bankruptcy Court.
A MEETING of the Creditors of William Albert Dando, of 151, Strand, in the county of Middlesex, adjudicated bankrupt on-the 28th day of January, 1875, will be held at the offices of Cecil Gurney, the Trustee, No. 5, Gray's-inn-square, in the county of Middlesex, on the 20th day of March, 1878, at two o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of considering the propriety of sanctioning the assent by the Trustee to a scheme of settlement of the affairs of the bankrupt.- Dated this 7th day of March, 1878.

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William applied for a licence to marry Sarah Louisa OLIVER when Sarah was about one month pregnant...

DIOCESE OF LONDON.
4th October 1875.
APPEARED PERSONALLY, William Elbert Dando Esquire of the Parish of Saint James Piccadilly in the County of Middlesex, a Bachelor, of the age of twenty one years and upwards and prayed a Licence for the Solemnization of Matrimony in the Parish Church of Saint James Piccadilly, aforesaid between him and Sarah Louisa Barnes of the same Parish, a Widow, and made Oath that he believeth that there is no Impediment of Kindred or Alliance, or of any other lawful cause, nor any Suit commenced in any Ecclesiastical Court to bar or hinder the Proceeding of the said Matrimony, according to the tenor of such Licence. And he further made oath, that he the said Appearer hath had his usual Place of abode within the said Parish of Saint James Piccadilly for the space of Fifteen days last past.
[signed] William Elbert Dando
Sworn before me.
J? S May
Surrogate.

Noted as a Gentleman, William's details appearing on the marriage certificate for him and Sarah are as follows...

1875. Marriage solemnized at The Church in the Parish of St James's Westminster in the County of Middlesex
Date: Oct 11 1875
Groom: William Elbert Dando (Bachelor)
Profession: Gentleman
Father's Name: Joseph Dando
Father's Profession: Manufacturer (dec'd)
Bride: Sarah Louisa Barnes (Widow)
Father's name: John Oliver
Father's Profession: Farmer (dec'd)
Ages: Full
Residence: St James's (for both)
Married in the church according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Established Church, by Licence.
Witnesses: Charles Louis and Sam Walton
Curate: Lionel Davidson

(Note - Sarah declared herself a widow but she had not in fact married John G W BARNES - she should have called herself OLIVER).

Photos of St James's Church can be viewed in the Gallery.
The author's visit to St James's Church appears on the blog.

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In June 1876, William was, again, recorded as a Gentleman, this time on the birth certificate of his and Sarah's son, Charles Llewellyn Ernest Elbert DANDO. Their residence was then 86 Regent Street, Westminster, Middlesex.

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In 1876, William agreed to act as one of the Liquidators in the winding up of the Financial and Investor's Protection Association Limited, a company that William was the general manager of...

The London Gazette - 4th April 1876.

The Financial and Investor's Protection Association Limited.
AT an Extraordinary General Meeting of the Shareholders of the Company, held at the Company's offices, No. 9, Great Winchester-street, in the city of London, on Saturday, the 11th day of March, 1876, it was unanimously resolved as follows:-
1. "That it having been proved to the satisfaction of the Company that it cannot, by reason of its liabilities, continue its business, and that it is advisable to wind up the same, that the Company be wound up voluntarily.
2. "That Mr. W. E. Dando, the General Manager, and Mr. James Graham, of the firm of Messrs. Graham, Leared, and Company, Public Accountants, of No. 7, Poultry, in the city of London, be and are hereby appointed Liquidators, to conduct such winding up at a remuneration, so far as the said James Graham is concerned, of twenty-five guineas, to be paid and retained by him out of the assets of the Company; Mr. W. E. Dando having consented to act as one of the Liquidators without remuneration."
S. Mayhew, Chairman.

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William became the General Manager of the London General Cab Company and gave an after-dinner address in early 1877 in front of the employees of the firm...

The Times - 6 January 1877.

LONDON CABMEN.- On Thursday night the London General Cab Company's directors entertained their drivers at a supper in the Ambassador's Hotel, York-road, King's-cross, to celebrate the successful termination of the first year's working. Mr. W. E. Dando, general manager of the company, was in the chair. About 60 drivers accepted the invitation of the directors. After the supper had been discussed two whips, presented by the general manager, were raffled for. Driver Barnet drew the Hansom whip, and driver Cross the whip adapted to a four-wheeler, and they both promised to regard the whip as much as possible as designed for ornament and not for undue use. Discussions immediately began as to whether each whip should be decorated with dark blue or light upon the boat-race day. The health of the Queen was proposed by the chairman, and pipes and punch were immediately afterwards served. Mr. Dando then addressed the assembled guests. He proposed the health of the directors of the company and the Hon. Lewis Wingfield, the chairman. He reminded them how the supper was brought about. The directors, who were not paid for their services, had themselves, without coming to the shareholders, asked the drivers to attend this entertainment. It was the duty of all drivers to extend the business of the company as much as possible. It had 170 horses and 68 cabs. It should have 6,800 cabs. The 250 noblemen and gentlemen who had put their money in the company did not look for a large return, provided that the cabs and drivers of London were improved. One or two mile-posts had been arrived at in the journey of the company. One was arrived at on October 30. The result of the posting up of those rules was the loss of several good men. Those men were members of the Amalgamated Cabdrivers' Society, who set three men at each yard to induce all the company's men to do no more work for the company. He congratulated those drivers, who went out at once in spite of that picketing, and he congratulated, though not so warmly, those who went out after waiting a day to see how the land lay. He himself argued the rules one by one with the drivers, and made a concession in one point; the deputation agreed that the rules were equitable, and the result was that there were 60 or 70 very contented and very respectable faces before him that night. He believed a great many cabdrivers left the Amalgamated Society in consequence of their attempt to tyrannize over the company. The company had at present four places where it worked ; but it was always intended to have one great and improved centre. A plot of land in Islington had been acquired from the Corporation of London, upon which in the course of time buildings could be erected for the accommodation of 600 horses, and he exhibited an elaborate drawing of sections of the proposed stabling. The company would also build their own cabs. The contemplated operations of the company embraced a provision of a club-room and other conveniences, which they would find very valuable, and which would add greatly to their comfort. He called the men's attention to the many advantages offered to licensed hackney carriage drivers by entering the company's service. Among those advantages be dwelt particularly upon the return to drivers who worked regularly for six months of a fixed commission of 2 1/2 per cent, upon the money paid in by them, and said that, considering the short time the system had been in operation, it had given great satisfaction both to men and their employers. A general and amicable discussion then ensued, which lasted till after midnight.

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In 1877 William attempted to have William Howard, who rented a couple of rooms at his offices in Regent Street, prosecuted for stealing some books belonging to William's wife. The Old Bailey Proceedings recorded the following details of the case...

NEW COURT.-Tuesday, May 29th, 1877.
Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

See original 492. WILLIAM HOWARD (37) , Stealing 7 books the property of William Elbert Dando.

MR. C. MATHEWS conducted the Prosecution; and MR. M. WILLIAMS the Defence.

WILLIAM ELBERT DANDO. I am manager of the London General Cab Company and have offices at 86, Regent Street—the prisoner also had an office there from last July—he occupied two rooms, in one of which was a book-case of mine, in which were seven volumes of a book called the "National Gallery"—I was going to remove them, but he asked me to allow them to remain and I asked him to see that they were not marked or soiled—they cost 9l. 2s., but they were very much depreciated and were worth about 3l.—he was absent from the rooms a considerable time about February and they were locked up—he was in arrear of his rent and I had given him notice to go—I discovered in March that these volumes had been taken away—I waited some time and then put the matter in the hands of the police, who brought me information and showed me the books, these are them (produced).

Cross-examined. I did not let him the rooms it was the London Publishing Association, of which I am a director; not the General Cab Company; the company's business is carried on there—the rooms were furnished—I never borrowed or removed any of the furniture, nor was it done to my knowledge—the books belong to my wife, and I had occupied the rooms before they were let to the prisoner—he stated that he took the rooms for the purpose of publishing the "High Church Calendar"—I went into the rooms a fortnight or three weeks after he left and then saw a vacant space in the book-case but did not exactly miss the books—I did not meet the prisoner several times after that, I passed him in a cab and could not speak to him I gave him in custody about two months after missing the books—I did not take steps before because I never suspected him.

FREDERICK WITTERTON. I am assistant to a pawnbroker, of Lower John Street, Golden Square—I produce seven volumes of the "National Gallery," three of them were pledged on 11th January by the prisoner in the name of John Little for 12s. 6d., and the other four by him on 12th January, one for 4s. and three for 5s. 6d. in the same name.

Cross-examined. I had known him about six months; he had pledged things before.

JAMES LOUIS (Detective Officer C). From information I received from the prosecutor I discovered where these books were pledged and took the prisoner in custody at 12, Richmond Street, Hammersmith—I read the warrant to him—he said "All right, I forgot all about the books, it is all through a man named Gardner."

W. E. DANDO (re-examined by MR. M. WILLIAMS). The keys were brought back to me by a man who professed to come from the prisoner, but I have some reason to doubt it—I swore before the Magistrate "Some papers were given up when the key was brought from the prisoner; I did not tell the man who brought the key that 1 had missed the books."

By MR. C. MATHEWS. The key was brought back about the end of February, and then I went into the room and noticed the space.

MR. WILLIAMS submitted that this was simply a case of illegally pawning, which was not a felony or an indictable offence, the books not being permanently disposed of, but only borrowed for a time. MR. C. MATHEWS contended that the felonious intention was shown by the prisoner's acts. THE COURT considered that it was a question for the Jury.

NOT GUILTY.

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William had his share of marital problems, which led him to take matters into his own hands. He seemed set on obtaining a divorce from Sarah so firstly, he apparently assaulted his wife, kidnapped her daughter and got his wife arrested and charged for trying to induce an abortion, with his full knowledge it would seem. Sarah also charged William with the assault and they were both bound over to keep the peace.

The following article appeared in The Times on Tuesday 4th September 1877...

At MARLBOROUGH-STREET, Mrs. SARAH LOUISA DANDO and Mrs. ANNIE LEWIS, both residing at 36, Waverley-road, Harrow-road, were brought before Mr. Newton on a warrant charged; the first-named with taking a drug for an unlawful purpose, and the latter-named prisoner with aiding and abetting in the offence. Mr. Wontner prosecuted, and Mr. Besley, barrister, defended. George Shepherd, a coachman, said on the 30th of April last he was in the service of Mr. Dando, of 86 Regent-street. Mrs. Dando lived at that time with Mr. Dando. On or about the 30th of April he drove Mrs. Lewis, whom he knew by riding in the carriage with Mrs. Dando, to several places - linendrapers, and then to a chymist's shop. He called at Mr. Eland's, a chymist in Oxford-street, and Mrs. Lewis went in. He then drove to Whiteley's and afterwards to a chymist's nearly opposite. Cross-examined, witness said Mr. Dando saw him on the 23d of last month, and asked him if he knew anything about going to a chymist's shop. Witness replied in the affirmative. Mr. Dando said he wanted a divorce from his wife, but he did not say that he had been in that court for assaulting her. On Saturday witness come to the court and swore an information. No one teld him Mr. Dando was going to charge his wife. He knew Mr. Dando was going to get up a charge of some sort, but he did not know what it was. Detective-sergeant Walter Andrews, Scotland-yard, said he received a warrant from this court on Saturday last, and in the evening went to 36, Waverley-road, Harrow-road, Paddington, and saw the two prisoners. He told them he was a detective officer and held warrants for their apprehension. Mrs. Dando cried and said, "I know who has done this ; it is my husband. Its quite true I took some ergot, but I'll tell you how it happened." Mrs. Dando then explained that, after some difficulty, she and Mrs. Lewis had procured the drug at a chymist's in Westbourne-park. Mrs. Lewis said "I did go to get the stuff, and I saw her take some of the stuff, and I really did not think there was any thing wrong about it. "Mrs. Emily Shreb said she was formerly in Mr. Dando's service. She remembered Mrs. Dando showing her a bottle containing a dark fluid. The bottle was placed on the mantelpiece in the bedroom, and Mr. Dando could have seen it as well as witness could. Mr. Dando knew what his wife was taking, and it was partly at his request that she did so. Witness once heard Mr. Dando say "Don't take too much of what you are taking." Witness thought that was the morning after Mrs. Dando went to the chymist's. Mrs. Dando took it while Mr. Dando was in the room. Mrs. Dando said Mr. Dando knew all about it. Mr. Besley said it was clear that Mr. Dando should be put in the dock, and the prisoners called to give evidence against him. Mr. Newton requested Sergeant Andrews to represent the matter to the Commissioners of Police. The prisoners were remanded on their own recognizances.

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The Lloyds Weekly Newspaper on 9th September 1877 went into a little more detail...

SERIOUS CHARGE. Mrs. Sarah Louisa Dando and Mrs. Annie Lewis, residing at 36, Waverley-road, Harrow-road, were brought up at Marlborough-street police-court, on Monday, on a warrant, charged - the first-named with administering to herself feloniously a certain drug with intent to procure abortion, and the latter with aiding and abetting in the offence.
George Shepherd, of 3, Havelock-street, King's-cross, said : I am a coachman. On the 30th of April last I was in the service of Mr. Dando, of 86, Regent-street, and Mrs. Dando lived at that time with Mr. Dando. On or about the 30th of April I drove Mrs. Lewis, whom I know by riding in the carriage with Mrs. Dando, to several places - linendrapers, and then to a chemist's shop. I called at Mr. Eland's, a chemist in Oxford-street, and Mrs. Lewis went in. I then drove to Whiteley's, and afterwards to a chemist's nearly opposite. Mrs. Lewis went into the chemist's shop and came out, but I did not hear anything. Afterwards I drove to Mr. Shepherd's, in All Saints'-road. I looked through the window, and saw Mr. Shepherd mixing up something. Mrs. Dando made a remark as to how long Mrs. Lewis had been in the shop. I then drove back to 86, Regent-street. - In cross-examination by Mr. Besley, the witness said: I did not know that Mr. Dando had been brought to that court in June last for assaulting his wife. On the 23rd of last month Mr. Dando asked me if I knew anything about going to a chemist's shop, and I said "Yes." He said he wanted a divorce from his wife. I did not understand that he spoke to me with reference to procuring something for abortion.
Detective-serjeant Walter Andrews said : On Saturday evening I went to 36, Waverley-road, Harrow-road, Paddington, and saw the two prisoners. I told them I was a detective officer, and had warrants for their apprehension, telling them the charges and reading the warrants. Mrs. Dando cried, and said, "I know who has done this - it's my husband. I did take some drug, but I'll tell you how it happened." Mrs. Dando then added - "Thinking I might be in the family way and being in pain, I went to a doctor and asked him to give me something to bring on a miscarriage. The doctor did not write me a prescription, but told me to take a certain medicine, and that I should be likely to get it at a chemist's in Oxford-street. I drove there with Mrs. Lewis, and she tried to get it, but was refused to be served without a medical order. We afterwards went to another chemist's in Westbourne-park and there Mrs. Lewis got it, saying it was for haemorhage. We then went back to Regent-street, and I took some of the drug much against Mrs. Shred's wish, she stating she would tell my husband. Even now I don't feel sure I was in the family-way." Mrs. Lewis stated, "I did go to get the stuff. Mrs. Dando told me she was in the family-way, and I saw her take some. I really did not think there was anything wrong about it." I then took the prisoners to the station. I am not sure whether Mrs. Dando said the medicine was to "bring on" or to "procure miscarriage."
Mrs. Emily Shred, residing in Surrey, said : I was formerly in Mr. Dando's service. I remember Mrs. Dando at the end of April going out in a carriage. She said on her return that she had been to a medical man, and asked him to give her something for a miscarriage, but that he declined to give her any prescription. He told her, however, that, if she went to Oxford-street, she would be most likely to get something. She said the doctor would have given her something, but he did not like his name mixed up with the matter. I saw Mrs. Dando on her return from the chemist's, and she showed me a bottle containing a dark fluid, Mr. Dando being present. Mrs. Dando took the bottle into her room, and she afterwards told me that she had taken a dose. I fetched some gin for Mrs. Dando, and after she had taken the medicine she took some of the gin. I told Mrs. Dando that if she was taking the stuff for an unlawful purpose she was very wrong. I begged of her not to take it, and told her that if she took it I would tell Mr. Dando. - By Mr. Besley : The bedroom was occupied by the husband and wife, and they lived together as husband and wife. The bottle was placed on the mantelpiece in the bedroom, and Mr. Dando could have seen it as well as I could. Mrs. Dando had a child about 12 months old by Mr. Dando.
The Witness (replying to Mr. Newton) said : I did not think Mr. Dando wanted telling about the matter. He knew Mrs. Dando was taking this drug, and it was partly at his request that Mrs. Dando took it, as he told her that he did not wish for any more children ; would not have any more; and that he would not support them if she had any more. I once heard Mr. Dando say, "Ducky, don't take too much of what you are taking." I think that was the morning after Mrs. Dando obtained the drug. Mrs. Dando took it while Mr. Dando was in the room. I told Mrs. Dando I did not believe she was in the family-way, and I don't know that Mrs. Dando said Mr. Dando knew all about it.
Mr. Newton : It is a very serious matter if the man was a party to the whole affair.
Mr. Besley said he did not propose to put any questions to the witness, but had no doubt the Treasury would do its duty. He asked for a remand, for after what had been stated it was clear that Mr. Dando should be put in the dock, and the prisoners called to give evidence against him.
Mr. Newton requested Serjeant Andrews to represent the matter to the Commissioners of Police, that they might take action in the matter if they considered it advisable.
In the course of the case it having been stated that four men had been to Mrs. Lewis's house, broken in, and taken away a child by a former marriage, Mr. Newton told Mrs. Lewis that when she returned home if she found anything wrong to at once go to the Marylebone police-court.
Mr. Wontner said that as far as the last part of the last witness's evidence went, nothing had been said to the prosecution. - Mr. Newton : How could all that has occurred have taken place without the connivance of Mr. Dando?
Mr. Dando : Will you hear a few words from me? - Mr. Newton: Certainly not. - The prisoners were remanded on their own recognisances.

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The Times - Tuesday 11th September 1877...

At MARLBOROUGH-STREET, Mrs. SARAH LOUISA DANDO, of 36, Waverley-road, wife of Mr. Dando, of 86, Regent-street, was charged, on remand, with administering to herself a drug, with a felonious intent; and Mrs. ANNIE LEWIS was charged, also on remand, with aiding and abetting her in the offence. Mr. Straight attended on the part of the Treasury. Mr. Straight said, as the case originally came before Mr. Newton, the request he had now to make was that there should be a further adjournment for a fortnight, that Mr. Newton might hear the case throughout. Mr. Besley, while not exactly resisting the application, would say that the charge preferred against his clients was of a dastardly and interested character, the charge being preferred simply for objects in the Divorce Court, the main purpose of the prosecutor being to get a divorce. He asked that the case might he adjourned sine die. Mr. Straight again pressed for an adjournment for a fortnight. Mr. Flowers acceded to the application, and the case was adjourned accordingly.

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The Wednesday 26th September 1877 edition of The Times saw the next instalment of the story...

At MARLBOROUGH-STREET, Mrs. SARAH LOUISE DANDO, wife of Mr. Dando, 86, Regent-street, and Mrs. ANNIE LEWIS were finally examined, the first charged with attempting to procure abortion by drugs, the latter with aiding in the offence. Mr. Straight appeared for the prosecution ; Mr. Besley defended. George Shepherd stated that he was formerly in Mr. Dando's service as coachman. In April last he drove the two prisoners to various chymist's shops, and in one of them he saw Lewis receive a mixture and bring it to the other prisoner in the carriage. Cross-examined, witness said he knew that Mr. Dando had been charged with assaulting his wife. Mr. Dando saw him recently and asked him about going to the chymists' shops, stating that he wanted a divorce from his wife. Witness did not recollect Mr. Dando mentioning the word "abortion." He afterwards swore an information at that court, and knew that Mr. Dando was going to charge his wife with something, but did not know what. Detective Andrews stated that he served the warrant on the prisoners at 26, Waverley-road, Harrow-road. He told them he had a warrant against Mrs. Dando for procuring abortion and against Mrs. Lewis for aiding and abetting. Mrs. Dando said, "I know who has done this ; it is my husband." She added that under medical advice she had taken some ergot. Mrs. Lewis said she was asked to get some "stuff" without thinking there was anything wrong about it. On cross-examination by Mr. Besley, the detective said he had been requested by the Commissioner to inquire into the matter. He had reported that Mr. Dando had assaulted his wife, and had a suit against her in the Divorce Court. Emily Threed, formerly servant to Mr. Dando, remembered Shepherd driving Mrs. Dando and Mrs. Lewis out in the evening about April last. Mrs. Dando, when she came home, said she had been to get something for what the witness knew to be an unlawful purpose, and showed her a bottle containing a dark liquid. Mrs. Lewis was present. Mrs. Dando afterwards came into the kitchen and said she had taken a dose of the stuff, and that she was going to take some more. Witness told Mrs. Dando she thought it was wrong if she was taking the stuff for an unlawful purpose, and begged her not to do so again. If she did she would tell Mr. Dando. Cross-examined by Mr. Besley, witness said she knew that what Mrs. Dando was taking was ergot of rye. It was in a bottle on the mantle-piece in their bedroom. Mrs. Dando told her she was taking the "stuff" partly at her husband's request. Her husband knew it was ergot of rye, and did not object to her taking it. He said if she had any more children he would not keep them. Heard Mr. Dando on one occasion tell Mrs. Dando not to take too much. Mrs. Dando told her that she told her husband all about what she had done. The magistrate intimated that if this evidence remained uncontradicted the prosecutor ought to be placed by the side of his wife. When the case was resumed yesterday, Mr. Straight intimated that, as there was a suit in the Divorce Court pending, he had advised, and he hoped wisely, the prosecutor to withdraw the charge before the court. Mr. Besley said as he had from the first denounced the charge as one of a cowardly and dastardly character, he repeated his words in all their strength. Mr. Mansfield said there was no further evidence before him, and, in the circumstances, he thought the most judicious course had been taken in abandoning the charges. The defendants were then discharged.

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The Times printed the following report the next day, Thursday 27th September 1877...

At MARYLEBONE, WILLIAM ELBERT DANDO, of 24, Regent-street ; EDWARD AUGUSTUS DANDO, of the Great Northern Railway, King's-cross ; ALFRED HUTCHINSON, 10, Wimpole-mews, Marylebone ; WILLIAM SCOTT, 63, Angers-street, New-cross ; and SYDNEY MAYHEW, 50, Walbrook, appeared before Mr. Cooke in answer to summonses which charged them with forcibly entering the dwelling-house, 36, Waverley-road, Paddington. They were further charged with assaulting Mr. and Mrs. Blackman and Mrs. Edmunds. Mr. Kelly appeared for the prosecution ; Mr. Goldenberg was for Mr. Mayhew. The wife of William Dando and a Mrs. Lewis were recently charged at Marlborough-street with a serious offence. The case was adjourned, they being allowed to go out on their own recognizances to appear. At the same time it was stated that Mr. W. E. Dando had forcibly broken into his wife's house, 26, Waverley-road, Paddington, and Mr. Newton, the presiding magistrate, suggested that if a breach of the Law had been committed he should be prosecuted. Mrs. Dando and Mrs. Lewis appeared at the Marlborough-street Police-court on Tuesday, and the case against them was withdrawn. It appears that on the day Mrs. Dando was taken into custody, Mr. Dando called a police-constable of the X Division and said that he wished him to accompany him to the house of Mr. Blackman, 36, Waverley-road, Paddington. where his wife was lodging, in case any disturbance should occur. Mr. Dando demanded admittance to the house, and on being told by Mr. Blackman, who answered the door, that he could not go upstairs, pushed past. Mr. Dando broke the panels of a door, doing damage to the amount of £1 8s, and collected documents which belonged to him or his wife. Mr. Mayhew, the solicitor to Mr. Dando, was sent for. When he arrived he was admitted to the house, but he with the other defendants took no part in the affair, with the exception of seeing some boxes taken out at the direction of Mr. Dando. At the close of the case for the prosecution Mr. W. E. Dando, who had a summons against Mr. Blackman for assault, said he would leave the case in the magistrate's hands, and not go on with the summons. Mr. Cooke, in dismissing the whole of the summonses, said he thought that Mr. Dando had a right to go to the house to get certain papers, but he ought to pay for the damage he had done, and if he did not pay it a summons would be granted against him.

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Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper (London, England) - Sunday, September 30, 1877; Issue 1819...

MARLBOROUGH-STREET. THE STRANGE CHARGE AGAINST A WIFE. - Mrs. Sarah Louise Dando, wife of Mr. Dando, 86, Regent-street, and Mrs. Anne Lewis were finally examined, the first charged with attempting to procure abortion by drugs, the latter with aiding in the offence. - Mr. Straight intimated that, as there was a suit in the Divorce court pending, he had advised, and he hoped wisely, the prosecutor to withdraw the charge before the Court. - Mr. Besley said as he had from the first denounced the charge as one of a cowardly and dastardly character, he repeated his words in all their strength. - Mr. Mansfield said there was no further evidence before him, and in the circumstances he thought the most judicious course had been taken in abandoning the charges. - The defendants were then discharged.

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Daily News (London, England) - Tuesday, October 23, 1877; Issue 9830...

MARLBOROUGH-STREET. Elbert Dando, No. 86, Regent-street, was summoned for assaulting his wife, Mrs. Sarah Louisa, Dando. - Mr. Grain appeared for the complainant; and Mr. Wontner for the defendant. - Mr. Wontner said he was not prepared to go into the case, and it was rather annoying to have to answer such charges while proceedings were still pending in the Divorce Court. - Mr. Newton, from what had ocurred in that court last month and elsewhere, said he was in hopes he should never see the parties again. Mr. Grain said Mrs. Dando had felt it necessary to come to that court for protection. She would be satisfied if her husband was bound over to keep the peace. - Mr. Wonter could not consent to that unless the complainant was also bound over. - Mr. Grain had no objection to that. - Mr. Newton thought the wisest course would be for both parties to be bound over, and his decision would be in accordance with that view.

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When the divorce case finally came to court, William was unsuccessful in his petition but the case reveals Sarah was by no means innocent.

There was an enlightening article published in The Times on Friday 21st February 1879, which read as follows...

PROBATE, DIVORCE, AND ADMIRALTY DIVISION.
(Before the Right Hon. the PRESIDENT and a Special Jury.)
DANDO V. DANDO, WADHAM, AGNEW, AND HARROWEN.

Dr. Deane, Q.C., and Mr. Bayford appeared for the petitioner ; Mr. Serjeant Parry and Mr. Pritchard were for the respondent ; Sir Henry James, Q.C., Mr. Inderwick, Q.C., and Mr. Middleton were for the co-respondent Dr. Wadham ; Mr. W. G. Harrison, Q.C., and Mr. Searle for the co-respondent Major-General Agnew.

In this case the petitioner, Mr. William Elbert Dando, sought for a divorce from his wife on the ground of her alleged adultery with the several co-respondents. The only case which it was attempted to prove was that against the second co-respondent, Major-General Agnew. It appeared that in 1863 the petitioner had sought for an introduction to the respondent from having seen her portrait in a friend's album and had at once proposed marriage to her. Her father, who was a large farmer near Doncaster, at first opposed any engagement, but soon withdrew his objections. At the end of three months, however, the engagement was broken off, and they do not appear to have met again for years. In 1864 she left her home, and went to Australia with a Mr. Barnes in the following year. Returning to England four years later, she found herself in London towards the end of 1869 without money or friends, and she then sent a letter to the petitioner, who at once went to see her. From this date until that of their marriage in 1875 they lived together at intervals and at various places. In July, 1871, she had gone to Ramsgate, and there made the acquaintance of Major-General Agnew, to whom she represented herself as a widow. It was not denied that there had existed an improper intimacy between herself and the latter from this date until the commencement of February, 1872, when he had to return to India. On October 11, 1875, the petitioner married the respondent at St. James's Church, Piccadilly, and he being then the manager of the London General Cab Company, they lived together at 86, Regent-street, the offices of that company. It appeared that they did not from this date live happily together, and she left him in June, 1877. Two months after this he had brought a charge against her of having attempted to procure abortion in the preceding May. The case was adjourned that the Treasury authorities might be asked to take up the prosecution, but this they refused to do. Just before this she had charged him with assault, and he had eventually been bound over to keep the peace for four months. It was attempted to show that the intimacy which had previously existed between Major-General Agnew and the respondent had been renewed on his return from India in 1876 ; but this failed entirely, though the latter did not deny that he had seen the respondent both at her own house and at another in Maida-vale several times in 1876 and 1877. It appeared that after his return to India he had remitted money regularly to the respondent as "Mrs. Barnes" up to the date of her marriage ; and the petitioner, though he denied having taken this money, admitted that at the time he was living with the respondent and that the money had gone to supply the wants of their home. The petitioner had claimed £1,000 damages against each of the three co-respondents, but declared in his evidence that if any were given he wished them to be settled on his wife. She was defended by counsel, but did not appear to give evidence. Major-General Agnew, on the other hand, went into the box and most emphatically denied that there had been any improper intimacy between himself and the respondent after 1872, admitting that he had seen her occasionally after 1875 ; this, he said, was always at her request, and she had wished to see him with reference to the education of the child she had had by Mr. Barnes, for whom the petitioner would do nothing. It was very imprudent, he admitted, but there had been no secrecy about these interviews, some of them, indeed being held at the house of her husband, in Regent-street, but none after she left him.

The jury, without leaving the box, found that the respondent had not committed adultery with any of the co-respondents, and
The PRESIDENT dismissed the petition with costs, emphatically declaring that it was a case that ought never have come into court.

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Similarly The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) printed the following on Friday, February 28, 1879; Issue 10653...

DIVORCE CASES.
DANDO v. DANDO.
On Thursday, the suit of Dando v. Dando, Wadham, Agnew, and Harrower, in which the petitioner, Mr William Elbert Dando, manager of the Patent Cab Company, prays for a divorce from his wife on the ground of her infidelity with the parties mentioned above, one of whom, Mr Wadham, is a doctor, and the second, Agnew, a retired major-general in the Indian army, was heard before the President and a special jury. The petitioner first met the respondent, then Miss Oliver, after having seen her photograph in 1863. He then became engaged to her, but the engagement was shortly after broken off and the respondent married a Mr Barnes and went to Australia. In 1869 Mrs Barnes returned to England and wrote the petitioner a letter expressing an earnest wish to see him before she finally returned to Australia. The result of the interview which followed upon this letter was that the petitioner and respondent lived together as man and wife till 1875 in London and in Jersey. ln October of that year they were married at St. James's Church, Piccadilly. Prior to this, however, the respondent had lived under the protection of the co-respondent, then Colonel Agnew, and doubtless the real Mr Barnes, and of this she told her husband. Two letters were read by Dr Deane, in opening these facts, which had been received by the respondent from the General, then at Gulhatti and Kohat in India, in which he addressed her in the most endearing terms. The respondent wrote to him to tell him of her marriage, and asked him to bring her an Indian workbox, and immediately on his return he visited her, at her husband's house, and, as it appeared, with her husband's consent and knowledge. While he was away at his daily business the respondent used to drive out, and, as alleged by the petitioner, used to have illicit meetings at St. Leonard's House, Maida Vale, with the general, on discovery of which proceedings for dissolution were instituted. The respondent, when living with the general, had been confined of a child; towards it and its mother's maintenance he contributed money. On the respondent's marriage the supplies were continued, and the case for the co-respondent, General Agnew, was that they were sent with her husband's consent, and that the charge of infidelity after the general's return was a fiction by which to extort damages. The case against the other co-respondent was not investigated, and the respondent did not appear. The jury found against the petitioner on all issues, and the President dismissed the petition, and condemned the petitioner in all costs, stating that the action ought never to have been brought.

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In 1881, William was lodging at 12 Princes Street, Hanover Square, London, with his 4 year old son, Charles...

Name: William E. Dando
Age: 39 
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1842 
Relation: Lodger 
Gender: Male 
Where born: Philadelphia, USA
Civil parish: St George 
County/Island: London 
Country: England 
Street Address: 12 Princes St 
Condition as to marriage: Married 
Occupation: Manager Of Public Coy 
Registration district: Chelsea 
Sub-registration district: Hanover Square 
ED, institution, or vessel: 2 
Piece: 91 
Folio: 26 
Page Number: 20

Household Members: Name Age 
John Hartnell 62 (Publican)
Annie Taylor 35 
Clara E. Taylor 15 
George C. Trench 21 
William E. Dando 39 (Lodger)
Charles L. E. Dando 4 
Annie L. Woolfoot 25

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Details of another bankruptcy were published in the London Gazette in 1882...

London Gazette - 7th February 1882.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
In the County Court of Surrey, holden at Kingston.
In the Matter of Proceedings for Liquidation by Arrangement or Composition with Creditors, instituted by William Elbert Dando, of 4, Wols-y-road, Teddington, in the county of Middlesex, but late of 86, Regent-street, in the same county, Commission Agent, and formerly of 151, Strand, in the said county of Middlesex, Adertisement Contractor.
NOTICE is hereby given, that a First General Meeting of the creditors of the above-named person has been summoned to be held at the office of Messrs. Harrison, 3, Fowkes-buildings, Great Tower-street, in the city of London, on the 27th day of February, 1882, at two o'clock in the afternoon precisely.- Dated this 4th day of February, 1882.
HARRISONS, 3, Fowkes-buildings, Great Towerstreet, E.C., Solicitors for the said Debtor.

London Gazette - 17th February 1882.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
In the London Bankruptcy Court.
In the Matter of a Bankruptcy Petition against William Elbert Dando, of 86, Regent-street, in the county of Middlesex, and 103, Cannon-street, in the city of London.
UPON the hearing of this Petition this day, and upon proof satisfactory to the Court of the debt of the Petitioner, and of the act of Bankruptcy alleged to have been committed by the said William Elbert Dando having been given, it is ordered that the said William Elbert Dando be, and he is hereby, adjudged bankrupt.- Given under the Seal of the Court this 14th day of February, 1882.
By the Court,
Wm. P. Murray, Registrar.
The First General Meeting of the creditors of the said William Elbert Dando is hereby summoned to be held at the London Bankruptcy Court, Lincoln's-inn-fields, in the county of Middlesex, on the 3rd day of March, 1882, at half-past eleven o'clock in the forenoon, and that the Court has ordered the bankrupt to attend thereat for examination, and to produce thereat a statement of his affairs, as required by the statute.
Until the appointment of a Trustee, all persons having in their possession any of the effects of the bankrupt must deliver them, and all debts due to the bankrupt must be paid, to William Powell Murray, Esq., one of the Registrars, at the office of Mr. Peter Paget, Official Assignee in the London Bankruptcy Court, Lincoln's-inn-fields. Creditors must forward their Proofs of Debts to the Registrar, at the said address.

London Gazette - 14th March 1882.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
In the London Bankruptcy Court,
In the Matter of William Elbert Dando, of 86, Regent-street, in the county of Middlesex, and 103, Cannon-street, in the city of London, a Bankrupt.
Edward Llewellyn Ernest, of 4, Queen-street-place, in the city of London, Accountant, has been appointed Trustee of the property of the bankrupt. The Court has appointed the Public Examination of the bankrupt to take place at the London Bankruptcy Court, on the 25th day of March, 1882, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon. All persons having in their possession any of the effects of the bankrupt must deliver them to the trustee, and all debts due to the bankrupt must be paid to the trustee. Creditors who have not yet proved their debts must forward their proofs of debts to the trustee.- Dated this 3rd day of March, 1882.

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William travelled to New York in October 1884 with his soon-to-be 'wife', Emma SHERIFF, son Charles, and mother-in-law-to-be, Jane SHERIFF. He was recorded as being an American even though the 1851 census had described him as a British subject...

New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957
Port of Arrival: New York
Line: 29
Microfilm Serial: M237
Microfilm Roll: M237_481
List Number: 1281
Port Arrival State: New York
Port Arrival Country: United States

Onboard the "Britannic" 6 October 1884
848 Jane Sherriff 55 F Lady England
849 E Sherriff 32 F Lady England
850 Chas L Dando 8 M None USA
851 William E Dando 41 M None USA

Name: William E Dando
Arrival Date: 6 Oct 1884
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1842
Age: 42
Gender: Male
Port of Departure: Liverpool, England and Queenstown, Ireland
Destination: United States of America
Place of Origin: United States of America
Ethnicity/Race/Nationality: American
Ship Name: Britannic

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According to the International Genealogical Index, 5 days after arriving in America, William underwent a marriage ceremony with Emma SHERIFF on 11th October 1884 in Manhatten, New York, United States. The details have been recorded as follows...

Husband: William Elbert Dando
Birth: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Marriage: 11 OCT 1884 Manhattan, New York
Father: Joseph Dando
Mother: Harriett C. Williams

Wife: Emma Sheriff
Birth: London, England
Marriage: 11 OCT 1884 Manhattan, New York
Father: Edmund John Sheriff
Mother: Jane Morre

The Italian Genealogical Group have also indexed this event...

Surname | Given Name | Month of Marriage | Day of Marriage | Year of Marriage | County | Certificate No.
Dando Wiliam E Oct 11 1884 Manhattan 37964
Sheriff Emma Oct 11 1884 Manhattan 37964

This 'marriage' was more than likely a bigamous one as there is evidence to suggest William was still married to Sarah - only in 1890, 6 years after the said 'marriage', did Sarah acquire a judicial separation from William and no evidence of a divorce has yet come to light. In the separation papers, William was cited as having committed adultery with, and continuing to live with, 'Miss SHERIFF'.

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William and Emma's first child, Ruby, was born in America on 3rd August 1885 but they moved back to London within the year as their childrens' baptism records show...

Child's Name Baptism Date Address
Ruby Elberta Kate Irene DANDO  14th April 1886 194 Adelaide Road, St Marylebone, Middlesex
Malcolm Douglas Mateo DANDO 9th October 1886 22 York Place, St Marylebone, Middlesex
Pearl Vera Dorothy DANDO 22nd November 1888 153 Maida Vale, London

William was listed as a stock broker each time.

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And yet another court case regarding financial matters. This time both William and his father-in-law, Edmund John SHERIFF, were involved...

The Times - 3rd August 1889.

HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE.
CHANCERY DIVISION.
(Before MR. JUSTICE KAY.)
EVEREST V. METROPOLITAN COAL CONSUMERS' ASSOCIATION (LIMITED) AND OTHERS.
This was a motion by the plaintiff, a shareholder in the defendant association, to restrain the association and its directors from applying any part of its capital or moneys in or towards the remuneration of the defendants, the Hamilton Syndicate, Limited, or other the founders or promoters of the association, and from giving effect to an alleged resolution of the association granting a remuneration to its founders out of its capital. The association, which was promoted by a company called the Hamilton Syndicate, Limited, was formed on January 31 last with a nominal capital of £250,000, divided into £1 ordinary shares and £10 preference shares. Its objects were stated in the memorandum of association to be (amongst others) to carry on the business of coal owners and coal merchants, and more particularly to supply coal at special rates to holders of shares or debentures in the association, and "to pay out of the funds of the association all brokerages, commissions, legal and other expenses for the issuing of the capital, and in respect of the formation of the association." By Clause 71a of the articles of association it was provided that "at the first annual general meeting the question of remunerating the founders of the association for their services preliminary to the establishment thereof shall be considered, and the shareholders shall then decide what remuneration (if any) shall be allowed, and also as to whether the same shall be payable in cash or in shares of the association, or partly in cash and partly in shares. On the 17th May notices were sent out calling the first annual general meeting of the association for the 27th May, part of the business being stated to be to consider and decide the question of the founders' remuneration. The meeting was held on the 27th, the plaintiff being present. Upon the question of the remuneration of the founders being brought forward, a shareholder present moved to postpone the consideration of the question for 12 months. To this motion Mr. Vincent J. Wallace, who was a shareholder in the association and also managing director of the Hamilton Syndicate, moved an amendment "that the remuneration of the founders should be a payment of 2 1/2 per cent on the nominal capital of the association, payable £5,000 in cash and £1,250 in shares." Mr. Wallace, in moving the amendment, stated that he represented the syndicate and that it was his syndicate which had floated the association. The amendment was, however, lost, the meeting being almost unanimously against it, and the original motion to postpone the question was carried. Before the meeting broke up Mr. Wallace handed in to the chairman a written demand for a poll on his amendment, and the chairman appointed June 3 for taking the same. The poll was accordingly taken on that day, when 2,563 votes were given for Mr. Wallace's amendment and 1,880 for the original motion, the amendment thus being carried. It was said, however, that the amendment was carried by means of a large number of proxies obtained by Mr. George N. Simons, one of the signatories to the demand for a poll, and stated in one of the affidavits filed on behalf of the plaintiff as "a person in a humble position, with a precarious means of livelihood, and although nominally a shareholder in the defendant association really a creature of the said Vincent J. Wallace and W. E. Dando," another promoter of the association and also of the syndicate. These proxies were given, it was said, under the impression that they were going to be used against instead of for the amendment. On the evening of the same day, June 3, a cheque for £5,000 was signed by the defendants, Montague Barber and Ernest Moreton, who were directors of the association and also of the syndicate, and handed to the syndicate, who at once paid it in to their account at the Imperial Bank. The cheque was promptly cashed, and the amount drawn out with the exception of a sum of £579 12s. 9d., which formed part of the syndicate's general cash balance at the bank. The plaintiff then brought this action with the object of restraining the association and its directors from carrying out the resolution on the poll of the 3d June, alleging that the poll was the result of collusion between some of the directors of the association who were also directors of the syndicate. On the 7th June last his Lordship granted an interim injunction restraining the association from paying any of their money to the syndicate, and the syndicate from parting with the proceeds of the £5,000 cheque. The present motion was to continue that injunction until the trial or further order.
Mr. Renshaw, Q.C., and Mr. Quin appeared for the plaintiff ; Mr. Horton Smith, Q.C., and Mr. T. Terrell for the defendant association ; and Mr. Beddall for the defendant syndicate.
MR. JUSTICE KAY said this was a very curious case, and raised a point of considerable importance. A company was formed called the Metropolitan Coal Consumers' Association (Limited), and one of its objects, as stated in the memorandum, was this -"To pay out of the funds of the association all brokerages, commissions, legal and other expenses for the issuing of the capital and in respect of the formation of the association." Now, that did not contemplate making a present, and his lordship was not sure that, if it did, that would not be bad. Then, article 71a provided as follows. His Lordship read it and continued : - It seemed that there was a meeting of the shareholders, and at that meeting a proposal to remunerate a syndicate, who, it was said, were the founders of the association, was rejected by a large majority. A poll was demanded, and a poll was accordingly taken, and the result of the poll was that a resolution was passed that £5,000 in cash and £1,250 in shares should be handed to this syndicate. Now, it was not pretended, as his Lordship understood, that the syndicate had incurred expenses to that amount, and the clause in the memorandum provided for payment of "expenses" only ; and if the syndicate had not incurred expenses to the amount voted by the resolution, then to the extent to which expenses had not been incurred the amount voted was a present, and a present out of the funds of this association. Even if the memorandum contained an express clause that the association might make a present of their money to any company or person, it was a very serious question whether such a power would be intra vires of a trading company like this. But it was a serious question whether the clause as it stood did contemplate a present. Therefore, so far as the case had gone at present, his Lordship had no hesitation in saying that there ought to be an injunction against carrying out the resolution of the 3d of June. And then there was the further very serious question whether the syndicate who had received the £5,000 ought not to repay it ; but his Lordship would not prejudice that question now by expressing any opinion upon it. The money had been paid and spent, all but £579, which, however, was so mixed up with the syndicate's other money at their bankers' that it was impossible to distinguish it. Therefore, he could not grant an injunction as to that. But as to the shares, none of them had yet been handed over to the syndicate, and there must either be an undertaking on the part of the association not to hand them over or an injunction against their doing so.
Mr. HORTON SMITH, Q.C., declined, on behalf of the association, to give any undertaking, and accordingly,
His LORDSHIP granted an injunction until the trial or further order, restraining the association from issuing and the syndicate from receiving the £1,250 worth of shares or any of them.

London Gazette - 23rd June 1891

Name of Company - The Hamilton Syndicate Limited.
Address of Registered Office - 7, Great St. Helen's, London.
Court - High Court of Justice.
No. of Matter - 2 of 1891
Date fixed for Examination - July 13, 1891
Names of Persons to be Examined - William Elbert Dando, Vincent I. Wallace, William Lichfield, E. J. Morton, E. J. Sherriff, C. M. Barber Walrond Clarke, G. N. Simons
Hour - 11 A.M.
Place - Bankruptcy - buildings, Portugal - street, Lincoln's-inn-fields, London, W.C.

The Times - 14th July 1891.

THE HAMILTON SYNDICATE (LIMITED) - A sitting was held yesterday at Bankruptcy-buildings, Lincoln's-inn-fields, before Mr. Registrar Brougham, for the examination of the directors and officers of this company. The Official Receiver (Mr. C. J. Stewart) conducted the proceedings. The Hamilton Syndicate (Limited) was formed in April, 1888, with a capital of £25,000, and in April following the company conceived and carried out the formation of the Metropolitan Coal Consumers' Association. The company appeared to have been chiefly engaged in dealing in stocks and shares, with the result, it was stated, that during the year 1889 dividends of upwards of £40 per cent, were paid out of profits. Mr. W. E. Dando, lately one of the directors, was called upon his subpoena, but did not appear. Mr. W. Lichfield, the late secretary of the company, on being examined, stated that he was appointed on February 1, 1890, and he had been previously engaged in a similar capacity. His duty was to keep the books, but, with the exception of the register of members and the minute-book, they never were in his possession at any time. They were kept, he thought, by the managing director. He had never seen any securities. The company's safe had disappeared, and he did not know where it was or who had removed it. One or two of the directors attended the meetings of the company, but none of them regularly. He admitted that in reality he had acted as nominal secretary only. Mr. Vincent J. Wallace, lately the managing director, stated that he became connected with the company about the beginning of 1889. Previously the company had done practically no business whatever. The principal parties in the company were Dando and his father-in-law. The company was formed as a promoting company, and the first business they carried through was the Metropolitan Coal Consumers' Association. The books had never been under his control, being kept by Dando, who also opened all letters. The witness thought it was Dando's syndicate. When the Coal Consumers' Association was floated the directors expected to be paid something beyond their expenses, but their remuneration depended entirely upon the vote of the shareholders. He thought Dando was interested in the National Association for the Protection of Shareholders. He had often seen him at the offices of that company. He had heard that Dando had gone to America. He knew that Dando had taken away the safe with the securities in it. The Official Receiver asked that the examination of this witness might be adjourned in order that some additional accounts might be filed, and Mr. Registrar Brougham adjourned the examination sine die, with liberty to apply. Two other directors, Mr. E. J. Morten and Mr. W. Clarke, were also briefly examined. Morten stated that he had only recently joined the board, and Clarke asserted that he had attended only two meetings of directors. The proceedings then terminated.

London Gazette - 31st July 1891

Name of Company- The Hamilton Syndicate Limited.
Address of Registered Office - 7, Great St. Helen's, E.C.
Court - High Court of Justice.
No. of Matter - 2 of 1891.
Dates fixed for Examination - Aug. 7, 1891.
Names of Persons to be Examined - William Elbert Dando, E. J. Sherriff, C. M. Barber, and G. N. Simons.
Hour - 3 P.M.
Place - Bankruptcy - buildings, 34, Lincoln's-inn-fields, London, W.C.

The Times - Friday 31st July 1891

THE COMPANIES ACTS, 1862 to 1890.

In the matter of The HAMILTON SYNDICATE Limited - Notice is hereby given that by an order of the High Court of Justice on the 25th day of July 1891 upon the application of the Official Receiver and Liquidator. It was ordered that WILLIAM ELBERT DANDO, E. J. SHERRIFF, C. M. BARBER, and G. N. SIMONS do ATTEND to be publicly examined before a Registrar of the High Court sitting in Bankruptcy at The Bankruptcy Buildings at 34 Lincolns Inn Fields, London, W.C. on Friday the 7th day of August 1891 at 3 o'clock in the afternoon.
Dated this 29th day of July 1891
C. J. STEWART, Official Receiver and Liquidator

Unfortunately, the author has not yet discovered the outcome of this case.

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And once again, there were more revelations in 1893. William used the alias, 'Thornton' (as it happens, the Christian name of his mother-in-law's father, Thornton Moore), as it seems, by then, his reputation was well known...

The Times - Friday 17th March 1893.

THE REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY (LIMITED).
- From the observations of the Official Receiver and provisional liquidator (Mr.' C. J. Stewart), issued under a winding-up order made against this company on January 11 last, it appears that the company was formed in February, 1891, for the purpose of carrying on the business of newspaper proprietors and general publishers, and particularly with the object of carrying on the publication of the Shareholders' Review. The company was promoted by Mr. W. E. Dando, who was the managing director of the National Association of Shareholders (Limited), of which the Shareholders' Review was the official organ. The Official Receiver asserts that in connexion with this company, however, Mr. Dando appears to have adopted the name of "Thornton," and was appointed managing director under this alias, the other directors and officers of the company being, it is stated, unaware of his real name until after the collapse of the company. The present whereabouts of Mr. Dando is unknown. The Shareholders' Review did not prove a success, and, after being carried on at considerable loss for six months, the directors in September, 1891, discontinued its publication. It appears that the funds of the company were subsequently applied in the publication and development of the Theological Review, but the issue of that paper ceased early in April last, and the company has not since carried on any business. The furniture at the company's office in Victoria-street, Westminster, has been seized and sold under a distress for rent. The liabilities are returned at £789, with estimated assets £15, and a deficiency as regards contributories of £5,045. The Official Receiver states that the failure is attributed to want of proper knowledge on the part of the officials of the company's business, also to the fact of Dando's connexion with the company becoming known, and to loss of subscriptions to the Theological Review.

London Gazette - 7 November 1893

Name of Company - The Review Publishing Company Limited.
Address of Registered Office - 66, Victoria - street, Westminster, S.W.
Court - High Court of Justice.
Date fixed for Examination - Nov. 27, 1893.
Names of Persons to be Examined - William Elbert Dando, J. Fraser Hewett, Major George Fowler, W. Edward Gregory, Herbert Arthur Dawson.
Hour - 11 A.M.
Place - Bankruptcy - buildings, Carey-street, Lincoln's-inn, W.C.

The Times - 28th November 1893.

THE REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY (LIMITED).
A sitting for the public examination of the directors and officers of this company was held before Mr. Registrar Emden, yesterday, at Bankruptcy-buildings, Lincoln's-inn. It appears that the company was registered on February 7, 1891, with a capital of £10,000, for the purpose generally of carrying on the business of newspaper proprietors and general publishers, and particularly with the object of carrying on the publication of the Shareholders' Review. The company was promoted by Mr. W. E. Dando, who was the managing director of the National Association of Shareholders (Limited), of which the Shareholders' Review was the official organ. In connexion with this company, however, Mr. Dando appears to have adopted the name of "Thornton," and was appointed managing director under this alias, the other directors and officers of the company being, it is stated, unaware of his real name until after the collapse of the company. The Shareholders' Review was not a success, and after its publication had been discontinued the company's funds seem to have been applied to the publication and development of the Theological Review, but the issue of that paper ceased about the beginning of April, 1892, and since then the company has not carried on any business. The liabilities are returned in the accounts at £789, against assets £15, the total deficiency as regards coutributories being £5,045. The failure of the company is attributed to want of proper knowledge on the part of the officials of the company's business, also to the fact of Dando's connexion with the company becoming known, and to another cause.
Mr. G. Stapylton Barnes appeared as Official Receiver ; and Mr. T. J. Phelps for Mr. J. S. Cooke, a shareholder.
Mr. Herbert A. Dawson, the secretary, upon being called and examined by the OFFICIAL RECEIVER, gave some details as to the formatiion of the company. He said that, so far as he knew, Mr. Dando was the only shareholder in the National Association of Shareholders (Limited), by whom the company was formed. He now learnt that there were only seven shares subscribed in the National Association of Shareholders (Limited). He thought that in reply to the prospectus of the Review Company £2,500 was subscribed, and, in addition, there were directors' shares of £2,000. On March 4, 1891, £1,000 was paid by the Review Company to the National Association of Shareholders (Limited) for shares in the latter company, but the money was used eventually in payment of four Review Company directors' shares of £250 each. Another payment of £250 was made to the National Association of Shareholders (Limited) as consideration for placing shares. But it appeared that £150 of that amount was repaid and applied in payment of founders' shares for two of the directors, Messrs. Fowler and Gregory. He stated that not one of the directors paid one penny out of his own pocket for shares. Dando or "Thornton" was the managing director of the Review Company. The witness had no idea, when the company was registered, in February, 1891, that the gentleman who passed as "Thornton" was Dando. The Review Company bought furniture belonging to the National Association of Shareholders (Limited) for £250 because that company was in difficulties, and his personal opinion was that the Review Company did not want the furniture at all. For a few months the Review Company published the Shareholders' Review. "Thornton" or Dando then wrote a letter in the paper concerning the Royal Assets Trust, and this led to an action against the company and others for libel, with the result that the publication of the review was stopped. The Review Company afterwards published a paper called the Theological Review, but both publications resulted in heavy loss.
A shareholder asked why the company stopped publishing a financial paper and started a theological organ.
MR. REGISTRAR EMDEN remarked that the change was a peculiar one, from finance to theology (a laugh), and called for some explanation. The witness replied that the course was adopted by the advice of their editor. The action by the Royal Assets Trust killed the financial paper.
Mr. Dando was then called, but did not appear, and the OFFICIAL RECEIVER stated that a warrant had been issued for his arrest.
Major George Fowler, a director, was then examined, and the OFFICIAL RECEIVER intimated that he should apply for warrants against two others who ought to have attended, but had not done so.
The sitting was adjourned sine die.

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William Elbert DANDO has not been found in the 1891 and 1901 England Censuses, perhaps because he had skipped the country at various times to escape the consequences of his dodgy dealings - we may never know. Nevertheless, his three children by Emma; Ruby, Malcolm and Pearl, appear in 1891 with Emma's parents using the surname, Thornton (the alias adopted by William). By 1901 they had reverted to using the name Dando.

It may not have been all bad! A Mr W. Elbert Dando appears to have been in Baltimore in 1900, acting as the honourable secretary for a concert held to raise funds for the Galveston survivors in Texas after the great hurricane caused devastation on 8th September of that year. Inside the program, there is a poem attributed to him entitled 'The Ruined City' which reads as follows...

In a pretty Southern city
Where the sweet Oleanders grow,
Where peace and joy were reigning,
There's nothing now but woe:

The wind and sea uniting
Swept the country near and far,
Bringing death and desolation,
All happiness to mar.

'Neath buildings wreck'd were corpses,
In countless thousands found,
And floating o'er the cruel sea
Were bodies of the drown'd:

'Twas chaos while it lasted,
And chaos when it ceased:
The storm in fury held full sway--
A mad destructive Beast.

But now to the survivors
Our timely aid we send,
Their suff'rings call for pity,
Their needs we must befriend:

For in this glorious nation
Are few who duty shirk,
And all whose means permit them,
Will aid the noble work.

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On Thursday 22nd August 1895, The Times reported that William's brother, Edward Augustus DANDO, was adjudged bankrupt. The article mentioned that... "For some years previous to 1880 he assisted his brother, Mr. W. Elbert Dando, a company promoter", ...although there's no indication in the article that Edward's present financial difficulties had anything to do with the time when he worked with William.

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The marriage certificate for William's son, Charles, dated July 1900, states that William's profession was a Company Promoter. Below is an extract about the role of a company promoter, published on the Victorian London web site. It's easy to imagine William could have been as described here...

"THERE is no more remarkable being in the city of London, with its many curious trades and vocations, than the company promoter. He has existed there, and flourished like a green bay-tree, for many years past. Though everybody knows him, either personally or by reputation, there is in all quarters much uncertainty as to his origin and antecedents. The successful company promoters are enormously wealthy, they have palaces at Kensington or mansions in Grosvenor Square, besides charming places in the country, and they are usually aspirants - and, it may be, not unsuccessful aspirants - for Parliamentary honours. They are, as a rule, Conservatives in politics, and have a large circle of titled acquaintances - impecunious lords, baronets, generals, admirals, and the like. The latter, who are termed 'guinea pigs', figure as directors of the companies launched by their City friends.

The promoters drive to their business in well-appointed broughams, drawn by high-stepping horses. They are remarkably particular in their dress, and wear a good deal of jewellery, their massive rings being particularly conspicuous. Altogether their appearance, both in the City and in the West End, is calculated to impress the casual observer.

Quick at figures, cool-headed, and gifted with a retentive memory, the company promoter is an excellent business man. There is a good deal of variety in his work. He transforms all manner of going concerns from private enterprises into share investments for the public. One day it is soap; the next, candles; then an hotel or a theatre, and so on. He also finds capital for, and works - by syndicate, or as a company - mines, valuable and valueless. His ability in placing an undertaking before the public in an alluring form is marvellous. What prophetic visions of wealth for those who are wise enough to subscribe. What dividends await the investor - if he will only walk into the parlour! How eagerly the public rushes to secure shares in the Brobdingnagian Diamond Mine, the South African Auriferous Dust Company, and the Borneo Sea Salt Company!

There is no one so gullible as an ordinary member of the British public. He will invest his last penny in an undertaking of which he knows absolutely nothing, although if he reads his newspaper, he must be perfectly well aware that kindred enterprises have, times without number, been exposed as out-and-out swindles. This starting of bogus companies is very like the confidence trick, the ring dropping, and the painted sparrow.

Of course, the 'fat', as it is termed, goes in a great measure to the promoter, and between him and the poor investor there are usually several individuals with their mouths very wide open.

Many a company promoter, when he has amassed considerable riches, retires from business, and, as one of the moneyocracy, gives sumptuous dinners and splendid receptions, and, by these and other means, gradually elbows his way into fashionable society."

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It may be that William travelled from New York to London in 1902 as there was a W E Dando who arrived on the vessel, Mesaba, on 12th March of that year.

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William turned up again on the 1911 census, then living at 1, Gainsborough House, Aldine Street, Shepherd's Bush, London. The property had 6 rooms including the kitchen and, living with the family was Emma's unmarried twin sister, Kate...

William E Dando, (Head), Age: 68, Married, Accountant, Club, Born: Philadelphia USA, British subject by parentage.
Emma Dando, (Wife), Age: 59, Married 26 years, 3 children - all still living, Born: County London Marylebone Parish.
Malcolm D Dando, (Son), Age: 24, Single, Secretary, Club, Born: County London Marylebone Parish.
Pearl V D Dando, (Daughter), Age: 22, Single, Born: County London Paddington Parish.
Kate Sheriff (Twin Sister - the form was signed by Emma Dando), Age: 59, Born: County London Marylebone Parish.

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William wrote his will in 1911, leaving everything to Emma...

This is the last Will and Testament of me William Elbert Dando of Gainsborough House Aldine Street Shepherds Bush in the County of London I direct payment of my just debts and funeral and testamentary Expenses and subject thereto I give devise and bequeath All my Real and personal Estate of whatsoever kind and wheresover situate unto my dear wife Emma to and for her own use and benefit absolutely. I revoke all former wills heretofore made by me and declare this only to be my last Will and Testament. I appoint my wife Emma Dando to be the sole Executrix of this my will. In witness whereof I have set my hand this first day of June one thousand nine hundred and eleven.

Signed by the said William Elbert Dando As and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of Us who at his ..... in his presence And in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. W. E Dando [signed]

Kate Sheriff Gainsborough House Aldine St W? [signed]
Charles W. Whitham? 29 Ludgate Hill E.P. [signed]

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In 1915, the Post Office London Directory showed William to be living at 20 Stonor Road, West Kensington, London.

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William died on 10th January 1918, aged 74, and his death was registered in the first quarter of that year. He was still living at Stonor Road when he died and his family continued to be connected to that address for some time after.

The Death Index states...

Name: William E Dando 
Death Registration Month/Year: 1918 
Age at death (estimated): 74 
Registration district: Fulham 
Inferred County: London 
Volume: 1a 
Page: 387

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Probate was granted to his 'widow', Emma...

BE IT KNOWN that William Elbert Dando of 20 Stonor Road West Kensington in the County of Middlesex formerly of Gainsborough House Aldine Street Shepherds Bush in the said County died on the 10th day of January 1918 at 20 Stonor Road aforesaid

AND BE IT FURTHER KNOWN that at the date hereunder written the last Will and Testament

of the said deceased was proved and registered in the Principal Probate Registry of His Majesty's High Court of Justice, and that administration of all the estate which by law devolves to and vests in the personal representative of the said deceased was granted by the aforesaid Court to Emma Dando of 20 Stonor Road aforesaid widow the Relict of deceased the sole executrix

named in the said will

Dated the 31st day of January 1918

Gross value of Estate ... £78.12.10
Net value of Personal Estate £

 

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